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Occult hepatitis B virus after acute self-limited infection persisting for 30 years without sequence variation

Bläckberg, Jonas LU and Kidd-Ljunggren, Karin LU (2000) In Journal of Hepatology 33(6). p.992-997
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: After acute self-limited hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, serological loss of viral antigens and appearance of anti-HBs is generally believed to signify viral clearance. Latent and occult HBV infection appearing decades after self-limited hepatitis B has not been reported, nor has the evolutionary rate of HBV DNA over the same observation period. METHODS: DNA from serum and leukocytes from 16 patients with acute self-limited hepatitis B 30 years earlier was tested by polymerase chain reaction and positive samples were sequenced. Liver tissue from four patients was also tested. Additionally, another 10 HBV strains isolated from acute HBV cases in 1969-72 were compared to 11 strains isolated from acute cases in 1998-99 in... (More)
BACKGROUND/AIMS: After acute self-limited hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, serological loss of viral antigens and appearance of anti-HBs is generally believed to signify viral clearance. Latent and occult HBV infection appearing decades after self-limited hepatitis B has not been reported, nor has the evolutionary rate of HBV DNA over the same observation period. METHODS: DNA from serum and leukocytes from 16 patients with acute self-limited hepatitis B 30 years earlier was tested by polymerase chain reaction and positive samples were sequenced. Liver tissue from four patients was also tested. Additionally, another 10 HBV strains isolated from acute HBV cases in 1969-72 were compared to 11 strains isolated from acute cases in 1998-99 in the same community. RESULTS: HBV DNA was detected in liver from two patients, but not in serum or leukocytes. The HBV strains detected in liver showed complete homology, in the sequences analyzed, to the strains originally infecting these patients. Ten strains from 1998-99 were identical in pre-S and core promoter/precore regions to strains from the same community isolated 30 years earlier. CONCLUSIONS: HBV can persist as an occult infection three decades after acute, apparently self-limited hepatitis B, and both the mutation and evolutionary rates of HBV DNA are low. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Hepatology
volume
33
issue
6
pages
992 - 997
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:11131464
  • scopus:0033659164
ISSN
0168-8278
DOI
10.1016/S0168-8278(00)80134-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
60c5732b-85ee-434d-a9ac-13d23d7d3bb0 (old id 1118140)
date added to LUP
2008-06-19 09:32:21
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:45:10
@article{60c5732b-85ee-434d-a9ac-13d23d7d3bb0,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND/AIMS: After acute self-limited hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, serological loss of viral antigens and appearance of anti-HBs is generally believed to signify viral clearance. Latent and occult HBV infection appearing decades after self-limited hepatitis B has not been reported, nor has the evolutionary rate of HBV DNA over the same observation period. METHODS: DNA from serum and leukocytes from 16 patients with acute self-limited hepatitis B 30 years earlier was tested by polymerase chain reaction and positive samples were sequenced. Liver tissue from four patients was also tested. Additionally, another 10 HBV strains isolated from acute HBV cases in 1969-72 were compared to 11 strains isolated from acute cases in 1998-99 in the same community. RESULTS: HBV DNA was detected in liver from two patients, but not in serum or leukocytes. The HBV strains detected in liver showed complete homology, in the sequences analyzed, to the strains originally infecting these patients. Ten strains from 1998-99 were identical in pre-S and core promoter/precore regions to strains from the same community isolated 30 years earlier. CONCLUSIONS: HBV can persist as an occult infection three decades after acute, apparently self-limited hepatitis B, and both the mutation and evolutionary rates of HBV DNA are low.},
  author       = {Bläckberg, Jonas and Kidd-Ljunggren, Karin},
  issn         = {0168-8278},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {992--997},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Hepatology},
  title        = {Occult hepatitis B virus after acute self-limited infection persisting for 30 years without sequence variation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0168-8278(00)80134-8},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2000},
}