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Management of pregnancies with suspected intrauterine growth retardation in Sweden. Results of a questionnaire

Brodszki, Jana LU and Marsal, Karel LU (2000) In Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 79(9). p.723-728
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Diagnosis and management of intrauterine growth retardation during pregnancy remain a major challenge in obstetric care. The objective of this survey was to evaluate the routine clinical management of pregnancies with suspected intrauterine growth retardation at obstetric departments in Sweden. METHODS: In 1997, a questionnaire was sent to all 59 obstetric departments in Sweden. Forty-two departments, caring for 83% of all deliveries in Sweden, replied. Four major topics were addressed: definition and diagnosis of intrauterine growth retardation; magnitude of the problem; clinical management; use of Doppler ultrasound in clinical decision-making. RESULTS: Intrauterine growth retardation is diagnosed by a combination of serial... (More)
BACKGROUND: Diagnosis and management of intrauterine growth retardation during pregnancy remain a major challenge in obstetric care. The objective of this survey was to evaluate the routine clinical management of pregnancies with suspected intrauterine growth retardation at obstetric departments in Sweden. METHODS: In 1997, a questionnaire was sent to all 59 obstetric departments in Sweden. Forty-two departments, caring for 83% of all deliveries in Sweden, replied. Four major topics were addressed: definition and diagnosis of intrauterine growth retardation; magnitude of the problem; clinical management; use of Doppler ultrasound in clinical decision-making. RESULTS: Intrauterine growth retardation is diagnosed by a combination of serial fundal height measurements and ultrasonic fetal biometry at 40 departments, two departments perform routine fetal biometry at 32 weeks. The diagnosis is most often made at 32-36 gestational weeks. Five departments use 1.5 s.d. below the mean as cut-off point for diagnosis of small for gestational age fetuses; 35 departments use mean - 2 s.d. and two departments mean - 2.5 s.d. Intrauterine growth retardation is suspected in 1.6-6.3% pregnancies. About 19% of patients with suspected intrauterine growth retardation are hospitalized. On average, 63% of all small-for-gestational age babies are diagnosed prenatally. Thirty-nine out of 42 obstetric departments use formalized management protocols. All departments use cardiotocography, repeat ultrasound scans and Doppler ultrasound for antenatal surveillance. CONCLUSIONS: In Swedish obstetric units, the diagnostic procedures and methods of fetal surveillance in pregnancies suspected of intrauterine growth retardation are more or less uniform. Doppler examination of umbilical artery is used at all responding departments and is considered a valuable asset in clinical decision-making. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
volume
79
issue
9
pages
723 - 728
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:10993094
  • scopus:0033827511
ISSN
1600-0412
DOI
10.1034/j.1600-0412.2000.079009723.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
853e86b1-1a20-47a8-9753-33e835c32c0f (old id 1118287)
date added to LUP
2008-06-17 12:47:00
date last changed
2017-10-29 04:18:27
@article{853e86b1-1a20-47a8-9753-33e835c32c0f,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Diagnosis and management of intrauterine growth retardation during pregnancy remain a major challenge in obstetric care. The objective of this survey was to evaluate the routine clinical management of pregnancies with suspected intrauterine growth retardation at obstetric departments in Sweden. METHODS: In 1997, a questionnaire was sent to all 59 obstetric departments in Sweden. Forty-two departments, caring for 83% of all deliveries in Sweden, replied. Four major topics were addressed: definition and diagnosis of intrauterine growth retardation; magnitude of the problem; clinical management; use of Doppler ultrasound in clinical decision-making. RESULTS: Intrauterine growth retardation is diagnosed by a combination of serial fundal height measurements and ultrasonic fetal biometry at 40 departments, two departments perform routine fetal biometry at 32 weeks. The diagnosis is most often made at 32-36 gestational weeks. Five departments use 1.5 s.d. below the mean as cut-off point for diagnosis of small for gestational age fetuses; 35 departments use mean - 2 s.d. and two departments mean - 2.5 s.d. Intrauterine growth retardation is suspected in 1.6-6.3% pregnancies. About 19% of patients with suspected intrauterine growth retardation are hospitalized. On average, 63% of all small-for-gestational age babies are diagnosed prenatally. Thirty-nine out of 42 obstetric departments use formalized management protocols. All departments use cardiotocography, repeat ultrasound scans and Doppler ultrasound for antenatal surveillance. CONCLUSIONS: In Swedish obstetric units, the diagnostic procedures and methods of fetal surveillance in pregnancies suspected of intrauterine growth retardation are more or less uniform. Doppler examination of umbilical artery is used at all responding departments and is considered a valuable asset in clinical decision-making.},
  author       = {Brodszki, Jana and Marsal, Karel},
  issn         = {1600-0412},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {723--728},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Management of pregnancies with suspected intrauterine growth retardation in Sweden. Results of a questionnaire},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0412.2000.079009723.x},
  volume       = {79},
  year         = {2000},
}