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Treatment strategy, disease activity, and outcome in four cohorts of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

Albers, J.M.C.; Paimela, L.; Kurki, P.; Eberhardt, Kerstin LU ; Emery, P.; van't Hof, M.A.; Schreuder, F.H.J.M.; Leirisalo-Repo, M. and van Riel, P.L.C.M. (2001) In Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 60(5). p.453-458
Abstract
Objective-To compare four different inception cohorts of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with respect to treatment strategies, disease activity, and outcome during a five year follow up period. Method-Data from cohorts of patients with early RA, with a standardised assessment at least every six months for five years from four different centres, were included in one database. Owing to slight differences in the individual study designs, linearly interpolated values were calculated to complete the standard follow up schedule. Results-Despite similar inclusion criteria, significant differences in demographic factors and baseline disease activity were found between the different cohorts. During the follow up an aggressive... (More)
Objective-To compare four different inception cohorts of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with respect to treatment strategies, disease activity, and outcome during a five year follow up period. Method-Data from cohorts of patients with early RA, with a standardised assessment at least every six months for five years from four different centres, were included in one database. Owing to slight differences in the individual study designs, linearly interpolated values were calculated to complete the standard follow up schedule. Results-Despite similar inclusion criteria, significant differences in demographic factors and baseline disease activity were found between the different cohorts. During the follow up an aggressive treatment strategy was followed in the Dutch and Finnish cohort, an intermediate strategy in the British cohort, and a conservative strategy in the Swedish cohort. A significant improvement in disease activity was seen in all cohorts, though the most rapid and striking improvement was seen in those receiving aggressive treatment. This resulted in less radiographic destruction in the long run. Conclusion-This observational study of cohorts of patients with early RA confirms that early aggressive treatment results not only in a more rapid reduction of disease activity but also in less radiographic progression in the long term. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
volume
60
issue
5
pages
453 - 458
publisher
British Medical Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000168324600004
  • scopus:0035022921
ISSN
1468-2060
DOI
10.1136/ard.60.5.453
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fd56651d-7cd8-47d1-869b-816fde539afa (old id 1119303)
date added to LUP
2008-06-23 14:39:45
date last changed
2018-01-07 09:04:15
@article{fd56651d-7cd8-47d1-869b-816fde539afa,
  abstract     = {Objective-To compare four different inception cohorts of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with respect to treatment strategies, disease activity, and outcome during a five year follow up period. Method-Data from cohorts of patients with early RA, with a standardised assessment at least every six months for five years from four different centres, were included in one database. Owing to slight differences in the individual study designs, linearly interpolated values were calculated to complete the standard follow up schedule. Results-Despite similar inclusion criteria, significant differences in demographic factors and baseline disease activity were found between the different cohorts. During the follow up an aggressive treatment strategy was followed in the Dutch and Finnish cohort, an intermediate strategy in the British cohort, and a conservative strategy in the Swedish cohort. A significant improvement in disease activity was seen in all cohorts, though the most rapid and striking improvement was seen in those receiving aggressive treatment. This resulted in less radiographic destruction in the long run. Conclusion-This observational study of cohorts of patients with early RA confirms that early aggressive treatment results not only in a more rapid reduction of disease activity but also in less radiographic progression in the long term.},
  author       = {Albers, J.M.C. and Paimela, L. and Kurki, P. and Eberhardt, Kerstin and Emery, P. and van't Hof, M.A. and Schreuder, F.H.J.M. and Leirisalo-Repo, M. and van Riel, P.L.C.M.},
  issn         = {1468-2060},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {453--458},
  publisher    = {British Medical Association},
  series       = {Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases},
  title        = {Treatment strategy, disease activity, and outcome in four cohorts of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ard.60.5.453},
  volume       = {60},
  year         = {2001},
}