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Survival of full-thickness retinal xenotransplants without immunosuppression

Rauer, Ola LU and Ghosh, Fredrik LU (2001) In Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology 239(2). p.145-151
Abstract
Background: A study was carried out to explore the survival of xenogeneic full-thickness retinal transplants in the subretinal space of hosts without immunosuppression. Methods: Nine adult rabbits received a complete immature rat neuroretina in the subretinal space. No immunosuppression was given, and the animals were followed up for 15 or 34 days. The eyes were then examined histologically with hematoxylin and eosin staining as well as with antibodies against major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classes I and II, and the retinal pigment antigen RPE-65. Results. Surviving grafts were found in five out of nine eyes. Three grafts displayed the laminated appearance of a normal retina, and two had developed into rosettes. In four of the five... (More)
Background: A study was carried out to explore the survival of xenogeneic full-thickness retinal transplants in the subretinal space of hosts without immunosuppression. Methods: Nine adult rabbits received a complete immature rat neuroretina in the subretinal space. No immunosuppression was given, and the animals were followed up for 15 or 34 days. The eyes were then examined histologically with hematoxylin and eosin staining as well as with antibodies against major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classes I and II, and the retinal pigment antigen RPE-65. Results. Surviving grafts were found in five out of nine eyes. Three grafts displayed the laminated appearance of a normal retina, and two had developed into rosettes. In four of the five specimens with surviving grafts, the host retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was continuous, and MHC labeling showed no or minimal upregulation. In four specimens, no graft was found. Three of these displayed RPE defects and an increase in MHC class I- and II-labeled cells in the host choroid, subretinal space and host neuroretina. Conclusions: Full-thickness xenogeneic neuroretinal grafts can survive for at least 34 days in an adult host without immunosuppression. Immature grafts can develop the laminated appearance of a normal retina. The integrity of the host RPE seems to correlate with graft survival. We conclude that xenogeneic retinal grafts can survive and develop if the integrity of the donor tissue is intact and if damage to the RPE is minimal. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology
volume
239
issue
2
pages
145 - 151
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000168063500013
  • scopus:0035072818
ISSN
1435-702X
DOI
10.1007/s004170000236
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c6594316-bb29-499b-a764-75a1b4aa09a6 (old id 1119327)
date added to LUP
2008-07-10 11:00:11
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:26:23
@article{c6594316-bb29-499b-a764-75a1b4aa09a6,
  abstract     = {Background: A study was carried out to explore the survival of xenogeneic full-thickness retinal transplants in the subretinal space of hosts without immunosuppression. Methods: Nine adult rabbits received a complete immature rat neuroretina in the subretinal space. No immunosuppression was given, and the animals were followed up for 15 or 34 days. The eyes were then examined histologically with hematoxylin and eosin staining as well as with antibodies against major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classes I and II, and the retinal pigment antigen RPE-65. Results. Surviving grafts were found in five out of nine eyes. Three grafts displayed the laminated appearance of a normal retina, and two had developed into rosettes. In four of the five specimens with surviving grafts, the host retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was continuous, and MHC labeling showed no or minimal upregulation. In four specimens, no graft was found. Three of these displayed RPE defects and an increase in MHC class I- and II-labeled cells in the host choroid, subretinal space and host neuroretina. Conclusions: Full-thickness xenogeneic neuroretinal grafts can survive for at least 34 days in an adult host without immunosuppression. Immature grafts can develop the laminated appearance of a normal retina. The integrity of the host RPE seems to correlate with graft survival. We conclude that xenogeneic retinal grafts can survive and develop if the integrity of the donor tissue is intact and if damage to the RPE is minimal.},
  author       = {Rauer, Ola and Ghosh, Fredrik},
  issn         = {1435-702X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {145--151},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology},
  title        = {Survival of full-thickness retinal xenotransplants without immunosuppression},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s004170000236},
  volume       = {239},
  year         = {2001},
}