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Asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis is reduced by regular physical activity. Longitudinal results from the cohort "men born in 1914"

Engström, Gunnar LU ; Ögren, M; Hedblad, Bo LU ; Wollmer, Per LU and Janzon, Lars LU (2001) In European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery 21(6). p.502-507
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study whether physical activity is associated with reduced occurrence of asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis. DESIGN: Longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses of the population-based cohort "men born in 1914". METHODS: Comparison of the systolic ankle/arm pressure index (AAI) at age 68 in groups who were sedentary, performed some activity, and performed regular physical training at 55 and 68 years of age. RESULTS: At 55 years of age, 100 (27%) were sedentary, 209 (58%) reported some physical activity and 54 (15%) reported regular physical training. At 68 years, 194 men (53%) reported the same degree of physical activity, 127 (35%) reported a higher physical activity, and 42 (12%) reported lower physical activity. Physical... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To study whether physical activity is associated with reduced occurrence of asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis. DESIGN: Longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses of the population-based cohort "men born in 1914". METHODS: Comparison of the systolic ankle/arm pressure index (AAI) at age 68 in groups who were sedentary, performed some activity, and performed regular physical training at 55 and 68 years of age. RESULTS: At 55 years of age, 100 (27%) were sedentary, 209 (58%) reported some physical activity and 54 (15%) reported regular physical training. At 68 years, 194 men (53%) reported the same degree of physical activity, 127 (35%) reported a higher physical activity, and 42 (12%) reported lower physical activity. Physical activity at 55 years (p =0.03) and increased physical activity between 55 and 68 years (p =0.03) were both associated with higher AAI at 68 after adjusting for potential confounders. At 68 years, AAI was 0.89+/-0.21, 1.01+/-0.13 and 1.05+/-0.11, respectively, in men who were sedentary, reported some physical activity, and regular physical training (p =0.0002). This association remained significant after adjustments for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: regular physical activity is associated with reduced occurrence of asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis, even in men taking up exercise after age of 55. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Exercise, Peripheral arterial disease, Physical activity, Atherosclerosis
in
European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
volume
21
issue
6
pages
502 - 507
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:11397023
  • scopus:0034933961
ISSN
1532-2165
DOI
10.1053/ejvs.2001.1359
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
be4db089-7551-4d44-9403-550955d99d4c (old id 1119389)
date added to LUP
2008-06-26 16:11:11
date last changed
2018-10-03 12:08:11
@article{be4db089-7551-4d44-9403-550955d99d4c,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To study whether physical activity is associated with reduced occurrence of asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis. DESIGN: Longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses of the population-based cohort "men born in 1914". METHODS: Comparison of the systolic ankle/arm pressure index (AAI) at age 68 in groups who were sedentary, performed some activity, and performed regular physical training at 55 and 68 years of age. RESULTS: At 55 years of age, 100 (27%) were sedentary, 209 (58%) reported some physical activity and 54 (15%) reported regular physical training. At 68 years, 194 men (53%) reported the same degree of physical activity, 127 (35%) reported a higher physical activity, and 42 (12%) reported lower physical activity. Physical activity at 55 years (p =0.03) and increased physical activity between 55 and 68 years (p =0.03) were both associated with higher AAI at 68 after adjusting for potential confounders. At 68 years, AAI was 0.89+/-0.21, 1.01+/-0.13 and 1.05+/-0.11, respectively, in men who were sedentary, reported some physical activity, and regular physical training (p =0.0002). This association remained significant after adjustments for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: regular physical activity is associated with reduced occurrence of asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis, even in men taking up exercise after age of 55.},
  author       = {Engström, Gunnar and Ögren, M and Hedblad, Bo and Wollmer, Per and Janzon, Lars},
  issn         = {1532-2165},
  keyword      = {Exercise,Peripheral arterial disease,Physical activity,Atherosclerosis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {502--507},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery},
  title        = {Asymptomatic leg atherosclerosis is reduced by regular physical activity. Longitudinal results from the cohort "men born in 1914"},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/ejvs.2001.1359},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2001},
}