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Incidence of a second tumor in hypopituitary patients operated for pituitary tumors

Erfurth, Eva Marie LU ; Bülow, Birgitta; Mikoczy, Zoli LU and Hagmar, Lars (2001) In Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 86(2). p.659-662
Abstract
Recently, an association between increased blood levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and increased risks of prostate, breast, lung, and colorectal cancers has been suggested. As today adults with GH deficiency are subjected to GH substitution, there is a pressing need for baseline tumor incidence data. The aim of the study was to assess the risk for a second tumor in a cohort of 328 patients with hypopituitarism treated for a pituitary tumor from 1958-1992. The patients were receiving conventional hormone treatment, but without GH substitution. The overall tumor incidence [standardized incidence ratio (SIR)] was lower than expected (0.85), but the 95% confidence interval (CI) did not exclude unity (0.59-1.21). Only two prostate... (More)
Recently, an association between increased blood levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and increased risks of prostate, breast, lung, and colorectal cancers has been suggested. As today adults with GH deficiency are subjected to GH substitution, there is a pressing need for baseline tumor incidence data. The aim of the study was to assess the risk for a second tumor in a cohort of 328 patients with hypopituitarism treated for a pituitary tumor from 1958-1992. The patients were receiving conventional hormone treatment, but without GH substitution. The overall tumor incidence [standardized incidence ratio (SIR)] was lower than expected (0.85), but the 95% confidence interval (CI) did not exclude unity (0.59-1.21). Only two prostate cancers occurred (SIR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.04-1.24). Two brain tumors (SIR, 1.96; 95% CI, 0.24-7.08) and two endocrine tumors (part of multiple endocrine neoplasm syndromes; SIR, 4.00; 95% CI, 0.48-14.5) had occurred. When excluding brain and endocrine tumors, the overall SIR decreased to 0.77, but did still not differ significantly from unity (0.52-1.13). Thus, a tendency for a decreased overall tumor risk, although not statistically significant, was noted, especially when excluding brain and endocrine tumors. This tendency was more emphasized for prostate cancer, but low numbers hamper a firm conclusion. These results may serve as a baseline for tumor risk among adult patients with pituitary insufficiency supplemented with GH. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
volume
86
issue
2
pages
659 - 662
publisher
The Endocrine Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000167004900037
  • scopus:0035096929
ISSN
1945-7197
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ac65e5b2-8a74-4cc6-b3ad-1c637d19702a (old id 1119572)
date added to LUP
2008-06-27 09:05:21
date last changed
2018-01-07 08:54:34
@article{ac65e5b2-8a74-4cc6-b3ad-1c637d19702a,
  abstract     = {Recently, an association between increased blood levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and increased risks of prostate, breast, lung, and colorectal cancers has been suggested. As today adults with GH deficiency are subjected to GH substitution, there is a pressing need for baseline tumor incidence data. The aim of the study was to assess the risk for a second tumor in a cohort of 328 patients with hypopituitarism treated for a pituitary tumor from 1958-1992. The patients were receiving conventional hormone treatment, but without GH substitution. The overall tumor incidence [standardized incidence ratio (SIR)] was lower than expected (0.85), but the 95% confidence interval (CI) did not exclude unity (0.59-1.21). Only two prostate cancers occurred (SIR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.04-1.24). Two brain tumors (SIR, 1.96; 95% CI, 0.24-7.08) and two endocrine tumors (part of multiple endocrine neoplasm syndromes; SIR, 4.00; 95% CI, 0.48-14.5) had occurred. When excluding brain and endocrine tumors, the overall SIR decreased to 0.77, but did still not differ significantly from unity (0.52-1.13). Thus, a tendency for a decreased overall tumor risk, although not statistically significant, was noted, especially when excluding brain and endocrine tumors. This tendency was more emphasized for prostate cancer, but low numbers hamper a firm conclusion. These results may serve as a baseline for tumor risk among adult patients with pituitary insufficiency supplemented with GH.},
  author       = {Erfurth, Eva Marie and Bülow, Birgitta and Mikoczy, Zoli and Hagmar, Lars},
  issn         = {1945-7197},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {659--662},
  publisher    = {The Endocrine Society},
  series       = {Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism},
  title        = {Incidence of a second tumor in hypopituitary patients operated for pituitary tumors},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {2001},
}