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S100B as a predictor of size and outcome of stroke after cardiac surgery

Bjursten, Henrik LU ; Johnsson, Pelle LU ; Birch-Iensen, Marianne; Alling, Christer; Westaby, Stephen and Blomquist, Sten LU (2001) In Annals of Thoracic Surgery 71(5). p.1433-1437
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Stroke after cardiac surgery is a clinical problem with often fatal or disabling outcome. To assess severity and probable outcome in affected patients only from clinical and radiological examinations is difficult. The glial-derived protein S100B has been suggested to be a marker of cerebral ischemia, and increased blood concentrations of S100B have been shown to correlate with size of lesion and prognosis after stroke. We studied the validity of S100B as a predictor of size of brain lesion and median term outcome in a consecutive group of patients suffering from stroke after cardiac surgery. METHODS: During a period of 17 months, 20 patients with clinical signs of postoperative stroke were investigated with S100B measurement,... (More)
BACKGROUND: Stroke after cardiac surgery is a clinical problem with often fatal or disabling outcome. To assess severity and probable outcome in affected patients only from clinical and radiological examinations is difficult. The glial-derived protein S100B has been suggested to be a marker of cerebral ischemia, and increased blood concentrations of S100B have been shown to correlate with size of lesion and prognosis after stroke. We studied the validity of S100B as a predictor of size of brain lesion and median term outcome in a consecutive group of patients suffering from stroke after cardiac surgery. METHODS: During a period of 17 months, 20 patients with clinical signs of postoperative stroke were investigated with S100B measurement, sampled at 5, 15 and 48 hours after surgery. All patients were examined with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to confirm the diagnosis, and the size of cerebral infarction was estimated from the radiological examinations. The patients were followed up for survival 24 to 39 months after surgery. RESULTS: S100B concentration in blood 48 hours after surgery correlated with the size of infarcted brain tissue (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). Nine patients had S100B levels exceeding 0.5 microg/L and a 2-year mortality of 78%, whereas the 11 patients with S100B below 0.5 microg/L had a mortality of 18%. CONCLUSIONS: Increased S100B in patients with a stroke following cardiac surgery correlate with the size of infarcted brain tissue. High S100B levels 48 hours after surgery have a negative predictive value for median term survival. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of Thoracic Surgery
volume
71
issue
5
pages
1433 - 1437
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:11383778
  • scopus:17344380632
ISSN
1552-6259
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9de873ec-d057-4a33-9f3f-80a1b52376c6 (old id 1120469)
date added to LUP
2008-07-01 10:00:56
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:52:20
@article{9de873ec-d057-4a33-9f3f-80a1b52376c6,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Stroke after cardiac surgery is a clinical problem with often fatal or disabling outcome. To assess severity and probable outcome in affected patients only from clinical and radiological examinations is difficult. The glial-derived protein S100B has been suggested to be a marker of cerebral ischemia, and increased blood concentrations of S100B have been shown to correlate with size of lesion and prognosis after stroke. We studied the validity of S100B as a predictor of size of brain lesion and median term outcome in a consecutive group of patients suffering from stroke after cardiac surgery. METHODS: During a period of 17 months, 20 patients with clinical signs of postoperative stroke were investigated with S100B measurement, sampled at 5, 15 and 48 hours after surgery. All patients were examined with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to confirm the diagnosis, and the size of cerebral infarction was estimated from the radiological examinations. The patients were followed up for survival 24 to 39 months after surgery. RESULTS: S100B concentration in blood 48 hours after surgery correlated with the size of infarcted brain tissue (r = 0.68, p &lt; 0.001). Nine patients had S100B levels exceeding 0.5 microg/L and a 2-year mortality of 78%, whereas the 11 patients with S100B below 0.5 microg/L had a mortality of 18%. CONCLUSIONS: Increased S100B in patients with a stroke following cardiac surgery correlate with the size of infarcted brain tissue. High S100B levels 48 hours after surgery have a negative predictive value for median term survival.},
  author       = {Bjursten, Henrik and Johnsson, Pelle and Birch-Iensen, Marianne and Alling, Christer and Westaby, Stephen and Blomquist, Sten},
  issn         = {1552-6259},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1433--1437},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Annals of Thoracic Surgery},
  title        = {S100B as a predictor of size and outcome of stroke after cardiac surgery},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {71},
  year         = {2001},
}