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Results of hip revision using the Exeter stem, impacted allograft bone, and cement

Ornstein, Ewald LU ; Atroshi, Isam LU ; Franzen, Herbert; Johnsson, Ragnar LU ; Sandquist, Per and Sundberg, Martin LU (2001) In Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research p.126-133
Abstract
The Exeter stem and impacted, morselized allograft bone and cement were used in the revisions of 18 consecutive femoral components (17 patients). The primary arthroplasty had been done because of osteoarthritis. All of the femoral components were revised for the first time because of aseptic loosening. The migration pattern of the Exeter stem after revision was studied using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. At 2 years after surgery, all 18 femoral stems had migrated in the distal direction (average, 2.5 mm). In addition, seven of the stems had migrated in the medial direction (average, 1.3 mm), and two stems had migrated in the lateral direction (0.5 mm and 1 mm, respectively). Sixteen of the femoral stems also had migrated in the... (More)
The Exeter stem and impacted, morselized allograft bone and cement were used in the revisions of 18 consecutive femoral components (17 patients). The primary arthroplasty had been done because of osteoarthritis. All of the femoral components were revised for the first time because of aseptic loosening. The migration pattern of the Exeter stem after revision was studied using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. At 2 years after surgery, all 18 femoral stems had migrated in the distal direction (average, 2.5 mm). In addition, seven of the stems had migrated in the medial direction (average, 1.3 mm), and two stems had migrated in the lateral direction (0.5 mm and 1 mm, respectively). Sixteen of the femoral stems also had migrated in the posterior direction (average, 2.9 mm), but none migrated in the anterior direction. The migration rate decreased gradually with time during the followup. Six femoral stems continued to migrate between 1.5 and 2 years after surgery. In patients with major femoral bone deficiency at the time of hip revision, the use of impacted morselized allograft bone and cement yielded an initial fixation similar to that obtained in conventionally cemented revisions. Pain had improved in all patients at the 2-year followup. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
issue
389
pages
126 - 133
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:11501800
  • wos:000170217600019
  • scopus:0034899232
ISSN
0009-921X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8ad63873-ef76-4beb-a6b8-316eafeed749 (old id 1120547)
date added to LUP
2008-07-09 09:38:45
date last changed
2018-01-07 05:20:02
@article{8ad63873-ef76-4beb-a6b8-316eafeed749,
  abstract     = {The Exeter stem and impacted, morselized allograft bone and cement were used in the revisions of 18 consecutive femoral components (17 patients). The primary arthroplasty had been done because of osteoarthritis. All of the femoral components were revised for the first time because of aseptic loosening. The migration pattern of the Exeter stem after revision was studied using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. At 2 years after surgery, all 18 femoral stems had migrated in the distal direction (average, 2.5 mm). In addition, seven of the stems had migrated in the medial direction (average, 1.3 mm), and two stems had migrated in the lateral direction (0.5 mm and 1 mm, respectively). Sixteen of the femoral stems also had migrated in the posterior direction (average, 2.9 mm), but none migrated in the anterior direction. The migration rate decreased gradually with time during the followup. Six femoral stems continued to migrate between 1.5 and 2 years after surgery. In patients with major femoral bone deficiency at the time of hip revision, the use of impacted morselized allograft bone and cement yielded an initial fixation similar to that obtained in conventionally cemented revisions. Pain had improved in all patients at the 2-year followup.},
  author       = {Ornstein, Ewald and Atroshi, Isam and Franzen, Herbert and Johnsson, Ragnar and Sandquist, Per and Sundberg, Martin},
  issn         = {0009-921X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {389},
  pages        = {126--133},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research},
  title        = {Results of hip revision using the Exeter stem, impacted allograft bone, and cement},
  year         = {2001},
}