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Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in primary Sjogren's syndrome

Theander, Elke LU ; Nilsson, I; Manthorpe, Rolf LU ; Jacobsson, L T and Wadström, Torkel LU (2001) In Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology 19(6). p.633-638
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS), fulfilling the 1993 European classification criteria compared with three different control groups. METHODS: Serological tests investigating the presence of antibodies against H. pylori were performed by Enzyme Immuno Assay (EIA) and confirmed by immunoblot (IB). The samples were tested for antibodies against cytotoxin-associated-protein A (CagA). The three control groups included were: one simultaneously collected age-matched group of orthopaedic outpatients without rheumatological disease, a random primary care patient sample from the same geographic region and a group of age-matched blood donors. RESULTS:... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To study the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS), fulfilling the 1993 European classification criteria compared with three different control groups. METHODS: Serological tests investigating the presence of antibodies against H. pylori were performed by Enzyme Immuno Assay (EIA) and confirmed by immunoblot (IB). The samples were tested for antibodies against cytotoxin-associated-protein A (CagA). The three control groups included were: one simultaneously collected age-matched group of orthopaedic outpatients without rheumatological disease, a random primary care patient sample from the same geographic region and a group of age-matched blood donors. RESULTS: 45% of the SS patients (n = 164) were EIA-positive for H. pylori and 30% were positive in the confirming IB assay. 23% had antibodies to the CagA protein. We found a clear and statistically significant increase in seroprevalence with increasing age. These estimates were lower compared to the control group of orthopaedic patients but similar to those in the other two control groups, thus showing the importance of multiple control groups in case control studies. In the group of SS patients there were no significant associations between a positive EIA, IB or CagA for H. pylori and the presence of abnormal serum levels of autoantibodies (ANA, anti-SSA, anti-SSB, rheumatoid factor (RF)) or an abnormal lip biopsy. CONCLUSION: Swedish patients with primary SS do not have higher H. pylori seroprevalence rates than controls. Neither was H. pylori seropositivity associated with the presence of immunological markers of SS such as circulating autoantibodies or a lip biopsy with abnormal focus score. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Primary Sjögren’s syndrome, Helicobacter pylori, autoimmune disease
in
Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology
volume
19
issue
6
pages
633 - 638
publisher
Pacini
external identifiers
  • pmid:11791633
ISSN
1593-098X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fe9de8c9-03ff-4a42-b4f3-b5e408f123fa (old id 1120958)
alternative location
http://www.clinexprheumatol.org/pdf/vol19/no6/19_6_PDF/5theander.pdf
date added to LUP
2008-07-16 09:55:44
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:37:44
@article{fe9de8c9-03ff-4a42-b4f3-b5e408f123fa,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To study the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (SS), fulfilling the 1993 European classification criteria compared with three different control groups. METHODS: Serological tests investigating the presence of antibodies against H. pylori were performed by Enzyme Immuno Assay (EIA) and confirmed by immunoblot (IB). The samples were tested for antibodies against cytotoxin-associated-protein A (CagA). The three control groups included were: one simultaneously collected age-matched group of orthopaedic outpatients without rheumatological disease, a random primary care patient sample from the same geographic region and a group of age-matched blood donors. RESULTS: 45% of the SS patients (n = 164) were EIA-positive for H. pylori and 30% were positive in the confirming IB assay. 23% had antibodies to the CagA protein. We found a clear and statistically significant increase in seroprevalence with increasing age. These estimates were lower compared to the control group of orthopaedic patients but similar to those in the other two control groups, thus showing the importance of multiple control groups in case control studies. In the group of SS patients there were no significant associations between a positive EIA, IB or CagA for H. pylori and the presence of abnormal serum levels of autoantibodies (ANA, anti-SSA, anti-SSB, rheumatoid factor (RF)) or an abnormal lip biopsy. CONCLUSION: Swedish patients with primary SS do not have higher H. pylori seroprevalence rates than controls. Neither was H. pylori seropositivity associated with the presence of immunological markers of SS such as circulating autoantibodies or a lip biopsy with abnormal focus score.},
  author       = {Theander, Elke and Nilsson, I and Manthorpe, Rolf and Jacobsson, L T and Wadström, Torkel},
  issn         = {1593-098X},
  keyword      = {Primary Sjögren’s syndrome,Helicobacter pylori,autoimmune disease},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {633--638},
  publisher    = {Pacini},
  series       = {Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology},
  title        = {Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in primary Sjogren's syndrome},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2001},
}