Advanced

Proton MR spectroscopy in clinical routine

Burtscher, Isabella M and Holtås, Stig LU (2001) In Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 13(4). p.560-567
Abstract
In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) addresses metabolic pathways and their steady states in different tissue types. The brain has by tradition, and due to technical limitations in other organs, been one of the tissues most studied by MRS, and both 1H- and 31P-MRS have been used. Although 31P-MRS is outstanding for the evaluation of sources of metabolic energy in the brain, 1H-MRS has become the major clinically applied method in neurospectroscopy, as it provides information on markers of neuronal function, myelin, cell membranes, and metabolic active compounds. Furthermore, MR sensitivity is much greater for protons than it is for phosphorus and 1H-MRS, therefore allowing better spatial resolution. This review focuses on... (More)
In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) addresses metabolic pathways and their steady states in different tissue types. The brain has by tradition, and due to technical limitations in other organs, been one of the tissues most studied by MRS, and both 1H- and 31P-MRS have been used. Although 31P-MRS is outstanding for the evaluation of sources of metabolic energy in the brain, 1H-MRS has become the major clinically applied method in neurospectroscopy, as it provides information on markers of neuronal function, myelin, cell membranes, and metabolic active compounds. Furthermore, MR sensitivity is much greater for protons than it is for phosphorus and 1H-MRS, therefore allowing better spatial resolution. This review focuses on neurospectroscopy and diagnostic insights into diverse neurological problems provided by 1H-MRS applied as a clinical tool. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, brain, disease, in vivo, human
in
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
volume
13
issue
4
pages
560 - 567
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:11276100
  • scopus:0035084206
ISSN
1522-2586
DOI
10.1002/jmri.1079
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6c83e02b-dcd5-46b6-a8b5-993f724bb118 (old id 1121399)
date added to LUP
2008-06-25 14:31:44
date last changed
2018-06-17 03:48:07
@article{6c83e02b-dcd5-46b6-a8b5-993f724bb118,
  abstract     = {In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) addresses metabolic pathways and their steady states in different tissue types. The brain has by tradition, and due to technical limitations in other organs, been one of the tissues most studied by MRS, and both 1H- and 31P-MRS have been used. Although 31P-MRS is outstanding for the evaluation of sources of metabolic energy in the brain, 1H-MRS has become the major clinically applied method in neurospectroscopy, as it provides information on markers of neuronal function, myelin, cell membranes, and metabolic active compounds. Furthermore, MR sensitivity is much greater for protons than it is for phosphorus and 1H-MRS, therefore allowing better spatial resolution. This review focuses on neurospectroscopy and diagnostic insights into diverse neurological problems provided by 1H-MRS applied as a clinical tool.},
  author       = {Burtscher, Isabella M and Holtås, Stig},
  issn         = {1522-2586},
  keyword      = {proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy,brain,disease,in vivo,human},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {560--567},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging},
  title        = {Proton MR spectroscopy in clinical routine},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.1079},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2001},
}