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Comprehensive ventilation/perfusion SPECT

Palmer, John LU ; Bitzén, Ulrika LU ; Jonson, Björn LU and Bajc, Marika LU (2001) In Journal of Nuclear Medicine 42(8). p.1288-1294
Abstract
Lung scintigraphy is the primary tool for diagnostics of pulmonary embolism. A perfusion study is often complemented by a ventilation study. Intermediate probability scans are frequent. Our goal was to develop a fast method for tomographic ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy to improve the diagnostic value of lung scintigraphy. METHODS: SPECT was performed with a dual-head gamma camera. Acquisition parameters were determined using a thorax phantom. Ventilation tomography after inhalation of 30 MBq (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) aerosol was, without patient movement, followed by perfusion tomography after an intravenous injection of 100 MBq (99m)Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin (MAA). Total SPECT acquisition time was 20... (More)
Lung scintigraphy is the primary tool for diagnostics of pulmonary embolism. A perfusion study is often complemented by a ventilation study. Intermediate probability scans are frequent. Our goal was to develop a fast method for tomographic ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy to improve the diagnostic value of lung scintigraphy. METHODS: SPECT was performed with a dual-head gamma camera. Acquisition parameters were determined using a thorax phantom. Ventilation tomography after inhalation of 30 MBq (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) aerosol was, without patient movement, followed by perfusion tomography after an intravenous injection of 100 MBq (99m)Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin (MAA). Total SPECT acquisition time was 20 min. (99m)Tc-DTPA clearance, calculated from initial and final SPECT projections, was used for correction of the ventilation projection set before iterative reconstruction of ventilation and perfusion. The ventilation background was subtracted from the perfusion tomograms. A normalized ventilation/perfusion quotient (V/P quotient) image set was calculated. The method was evaluated on a trial group of 15 patients. RESULTS: Ventilation and perfusion images had adequate quality and showed ventilation/perfusion (V/Q quotient) relationships more clearly than did planar images. Frontal and sagittal slices were superior to planar scintigraphy for characterization of embolized areas. The V/Q quotient was supportive, particularly in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. CONCLUSION: Fast, high-quality, ventilation/perfusion SPECT with standard isotopes doses is feasible and may contribute to higher objectivity in evaluating lung embolism as well as other lung diseases. The costs for the procedure and patient care until diagnosis are low because of the comprehensive system for the study and, particularly, the short time for its completion. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
lung, perfusion, ventilation, lung embolism, tomography
in
Journal of Nuclear Medicine
volume
42
issue
8
pages
1288 - 1294
publisher
Society of Nuclear Medicine
external identifiers
  • pmid:11483693
  • scopus:0034906421
ISSN
0161-5505
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f055f201-add7-48b0-a6f9-92417a8654a0 (old id 1121847)
date added to LUP
2008-07-09 10:07:36
date last changed
2018-02-18 04:21:19
@article{f055f201-add7-48b0-a6f9-92417a8654a0,
  abstract     = {Lung scintigraphy is the primary tool for diagnostics of pulmonary embolism. A perfusion study is often complemented by a ventilation study. Intermediate probability scans are frequent. Our goal was to develop a fast method for tomographic ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy to improve the diagnostic value of lung scintigraphy. METHODS: SPECT was performed with a dual-head gamma camera. Acquisition parameters were determined using a thorax phantom. Ventilation tomography after inhalation of 30 MBq (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) aerosol was, without patient movement, followed by perfusion tomography after an intravenous injection of 100 MBq (99m)Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin (MAA). Total SPECT acquisition time was 20 min. (99m)Tc-DTPA clearance, calculated from initial and final SPECT projections, was used for correction of the ventilation projection set before iterative reconstruction of ventilation and perfusion. The ventilation background was subtracted from the perfusion tomograms. A normalized ventilation/perfusion quotient (V/P quotient) image set was calculated. The method was evaluated on a trial group of 15 patients. RESULTS: Ventilation and perfusion images had adequate quality and showed ventilation/perfusion (V/Q quotient) relationships more clearly than did planar images. Frontal and sagittal slices were superior to planar scintigraphy for characterization of embolized areas. The V/Q quotient was supportive, particularly in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. CONCLUSION: Fast, high-quality, ventilation/perfusion SPECT with standard isotopes doses is feasible and may contribute to higher objectivity in evaluating lung embolism as well as other lung diseases. The costs for the procedure and patient care until diagnosis are low because of the comprehensive system for the study and, particularly, the short time for its completion.},
  author       = {Palmer, John and Bitzén, Ulrika and Jonson, Björn and Bajc, Marika},
  issn         = {0161-5505},
  keyword      = {lung,perfusion,ventilation,lung embolism,tomography},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1288--1294},
  publisher    = {Society of Nuclear Medicine},
  series       = {Journal of Nuclear Medicine},
  title        = {Comprehensive ventilation/perfusion SPECT},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2001},
}