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Serological screening for celiac disease in healthy 2.5-year-old children in Sweden

Carlsson, Annelie LU ; Axelsson, I E LU ; Borulf, S K LU and Bredberg, Anders LU (2001) In Pediatrics 107(1). p.42-45
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The study was designed to investigate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) among 2.5-year-old children in a Swedish urban population with a high incidence of CD.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six hundred ninety apparently healthy children, born in the 12-month period of July 1992 through June 1993, were screened for immunoglobulin A (IgA) antigliadin antibodies and IgA antiendomysium antibodies, and those antibody-positive at repeated testing were further investigated with intestinal biopsy.

RESULTS: Of the 690 children, 6 were both IgA antigliadin antibody- and IgA antiendomysium antibody-positive, and 7 were antiendomysium antibody-positive but antigliadin antibody-negative. Jejunal biopsy, performed in 12 cases,... (More)

OBJECTIVE: The study was designed to investigate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) among 2.5-year-old children in a Swedish urban population with a high incidence of CD.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six hundred ninety apparently healthy children, born in the 12-month period of July 1992 through June 1993, were screened for immunoglobulin A (IgA) antigliadin antibodies and IgA antiendomysium antibodies, and those antibody-positive at repeated testing were further investigated with intestinal biopsy.

RESULTS: Of the 690 children, 6 were both IgA antigliadin antibody- and IgA antiendomysium antibody-positive, and 7 were antiendomysium antibody-positive but antigliadin antibody-negative. Jejunal biopsy, performed in 12 cases, manifested partial or total villous atrophy in 8 cases. Thus, together with an additional child whose parents declined the offered biopsy, but whose response to a gluten-free diet confirmed the presence of CD, the prevalence of CD in the study series was 1.3% (9/690; 95% confidence interval:.4-2.2). However, independent of the study, an additional 22 cases of symptomatic, biopsy-verified CD have already been detected in the birth cohort of 3004 children.

CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of CD in our study series was high, at least 1.0%, but may be as high as 2.0% if the frequency of silent CD is as high as we have found in the remaining unscreened cohort. These findings confirm that CD is one of the most common chronic disorders.

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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Atrophy, Biopsy, Celiac Disease, Child, Preschool, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Immunoglobulin A, Immunoglobulin G, Jejunum, Male, Mass Screening, Prevalence, Reference Values, Serologic Tests, Sweden, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
in
Pediatrics
volume
107
issue
1
pages
4 pages
publisher
American Academy of Pediatrics
external identifiers
  • pmid:11134432
  • scopus:0035186741
ISSN
1098-4275
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ff6bc0d3-0941-4f1c-943d-e7a587882645 (old id 1122581)
date added to LUP
2008-06-25 15:36:07
date last changed
2018-06-10 04:34:18
@article{ff6bc0d3-0941-4f1c-943d-e7a587882645,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVE: The study was designed to investigate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) among 2.5-year-old children in a Swedish urban population with a high incidence of CD.</p><p>MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six hundred ninety apparently healthy children, born in the 12-month period of July 1992 through June 1993, were screened for immunoglobulin A (IgA) antigliadin antibodies and IgA antiendomysium antibodies, and those antibody-positive at repeated testing were further investigated with intestinal biopsy.</p><p>RESULTS: Of the 690 children, 6 were both IgA antigliadin antibody- and IgA antiendomysium antibody-positive, and 7 were antiendomysium antibody-positive but antigliadin antibody-negative. Jejunal biopsy, performed in 12 cases, manifested partial or total villous atrophy in 8 cases. Thus, together with an additional child whose parents declined the offered biopsy, but whose response to a gluten-free diet confirmed the presence of CD, the prevalence of CD in the study series was 1.3% (9/690; 95% confidence interval:.4-2.2). However, independent of the study, an additional 22 cases of symptomatic, biopsy-verified CD have already been detected in the birth cohort of 3004 children.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of CD in our study series was high, at least 1.0%, but may be as high as 2.0% if the frequency of silent CD is as high as we have found in the remaining unscreened cohort. These findings confirm that CD is one of the most common chronic disorders.</p>},
  author       = {Carlsson, Annelie and Axelsson, I E and Borulf, S K and Bredberg, Anders},
  issn         = {1098-4275},
  keyword      = {Atrophy,Biopsy,Celiac Disease,Child, Preschool,Female,Follow-Up Studies,Humans,Immunoglobulin A,Immunoglobulin G,Jejunum,Male,Mass Screening,Prevalence,Reference Values,Serologic Tests,Sweden,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {42--45},
  publisher    = {American Academy of Pediatrics},
  series       = {Pediatrics},
  title        = {Serological screening for celiac disease in healthy 2.5-year-old children in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {107},
  year         = {2001},
}