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Patient satisfaction compared with general health and disease-specific questionnaires in knee arthroplasty patients

Robertsson, Otto LU and Dunbar, Michael LU (2001) In Journal of Arthroplasty 16(4). p.476-482
Abstract
When assessing the health status of patients after orthopaedic surgery, such as knee arthroplasty, general health and disease-specific questionnaires are gaining in popularity because of their precision in detecting subtle differences. Self-administered postal surveys using extensive questionnaires have associated patient burden, however, which may have an impact on response rate and completeness. When a high response rate is important or when the use of comprehensive questionnaires is not practical, it may be possible to gain useful outcome data after a surgical procedure by simpler means. Two postal surveys to knee arthroplasty patients were performed. In the first survey, we posed a simple question regarding patient satisfaction to... (More)
When assessing the health status of patients after orthopaedic surgery, such as knee arthroplasty, general health and disease-specific questionnaires are gaining in popularity because of their precision in detecting subtle differences. Self-administered postal surveys using extensive questionnaires have associated patient burden, however, which may have an impact on response rate and completeness. When a high response rate is important or when the use of comprehensive questionnaires is not practical, it may be possible to gain useful outcome data after a surgical procedure by simpler means. Two postal surveys to knee arthroplasty patients were performed. In the first survey, we posed a simple question regarding patient satisfaction to 27,114 patients. A second survey was sent 9 months later to 3,600 of the same patients; the same simple satisfaction question was posed along with several previously validated general health (NHP, SF36, SF12) and disease/site-specific (Oxford-12, WOMAC) outcome questionnaires. We found that patient satisfaction correlates significantly with general health and disease-specific outcome measures, with the highest correlation to the domains that relate to pain and function. When sent a simple satisfaction questionnaire, 95% of the patients answered, whereas the usable return rate of the more comprehensive questionnaires was 18% to 45% lower. Patients not responding to the comprehensive questionnaires were more often unsatisfied with their operated knee than patients responding. (Less)
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author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
outcomes, total knee arthroplasty, satisfaction, postal survey, health status indicators
in
Journal of Arthroplasty
volume
16
issue
4
pages
476 - 482
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:11402411
  • scopus:0034987573
  • pmid:11402411
ISSN
0883-5403
DOI
10.1054/arth.2001.22395a
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e354cd9c-4fdd-4e82-9bb5-076e91df4655 (old id 1122873)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:29:35
date last changed
2020-10-27 01:47:41
@article{e354cd9c-4fdd-4e82-9bb5-076e91df4655,
  abstract     = {When assessing the health status of patients after orthopaedic surgery, such as knee arthroplasty, general health and disease-specific questionnaires are gaining in popularity because of their precision in detecting subtle differences. Self-administered postal surveys using extensive questionnaires have associated patient burden, however, which may have an impact on response rate and completeness. When a high response rate is important or when the use of comprehensive questionnaires is not practical, it may be possible to gain useful outcome data after a surgical procedure by simpler means. Two postal surveys to knee arthroplasty patients were performed. In the first survey, we posed a simple question regarding patient satisfaction to 27,114 patients. A second survey was sent 9 months later to 3,600 of the same patients; the same simple satisfaction question was posed along with several previously validated general health (NHP, SF36, SF12) and disease/site-specific (Oxford-12, WOMAC) outcome questionnaires. We found that patient satisfaction correlates significantly with general health and disease-specific outcome measures, with the highest correlation to the domains that relate to pain and function. When sent a simple satisfaction questionnaire, 95% of the patients answered, whereas the usable return rate of the more comprehensive questionnaires was 18% to 45% lower. Patients not responding to the comprehensive questionnaires were more often unsatisfied with their operated knee than patients responding.},
  author       = {Robertsson, Otto and Dunbar, Michael},
  issn         = {0883-5403},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {476--482},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Arthroplasty},
  title        = {Patient satisfaction compared with general health and disease-specific questionnaires in knee arthroplasty patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1054/arth.2001.22395a},
  doi          = {10.1054/arth.2001.22395a},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2001},
}