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Breathing patterns and aerosol delivery: impact of regular human patterns, and sine and square waveforms on rate of delivery

Nikander, Kurt; Denyer, John; Smith, Nick and Wollmer, Per LU (2001) In Journal of Aerosol Medicine1988-01-01+01:002007-01-01+01:00 14(3). p.327-333
Abstract
In vitro tests are commonly employed to assess nebulizer performance. Whether the square or sine waveforms employed during in vitro tests could alter the nebulizer performance compared to that observed when a patient breathes through the nebulizer is debatable. Accordingly, the aim of this in vitro study was to compare the rates of delivery from nebulizers with simulated human breathing patterns to those obtained with matching sine and square waveforms. Regular human breathing patterns with tidal volumes (VT) of approximately 40, approximately 200, approximately 500, and approximately 800 mL were selected. Sine and square waveforms that matched the VT, peak inspiratory flow rate (PIF), breathing frequency (f), and inspiratory duty cycle... (More)
In vitro tests are commonly employed to assess nebulizer performance. Whether the square or sine waveforms employed during in vitro tests could alter the nebulizer performance compared to that observed when a patient breathes through the nebulizer is debatable. Accordingly, the aim of this in vitro study was to compare the rates of delivery from nebulizers with simulated human breathing patterns to those obtained with matching sine and square waveforms. Regular human breathing patterns with tidal volumes (VT) of approximately 40, approximately 200, approximately 500, and approximately 800 mL were selected. Sine and square waveforms that matched the VT, peak inspiratory flow rate (PIF), breathing frequency (f), and inspiratory duty cycle (t(i)/t(tot)) of the human breathing patterns were created with a breathing simulator. The rate of delivery of nebulized technetium-99m-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (99mTC-DTPA) from two different jet nebulizer brands was determined. The rate of delivery was defined as the amount of the 99mTC-DTPA deposited during 30 sec of nebulization on a filter placed between the nebulizer and the breathing simulator. The rate of delivery of 99mTC-DTPA with the human breathing pattern was similar to that measured with the matching sine or square waveforms for either nebulizer. The configuration of the breath (PIF, VT, f, t(i)/t(tot)) did, however, influence the rate of delivery. In conclusion, the shape of the waveform, in other words, one resulting from a human breathing pattern, or a matching sine or square waveform, did not influence the rate of 99mTC-DTPA delivery from a nebulizer in vitro. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Aerosol Medicine1988-01-01+01:002007-01-01+01:00
volume
14
issue
3
pages
327 - 333
publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
external identifiers
  • pmid:11693844
  • scopus:0034864140
ISSN
0894-2684
DOI
10.1089/089426801316970286
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ea7535c6-8f56-45d9-8d20-b019022ecf77 (old id 1122881)
date added to LUP
2008-07-08 10:20:08
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:33:54
@article{ea7535c6-8f56-45d9-8d20-b019022ecf77,
  abstract     = {In vitro tests are commonly employed to assess nebulizer performance. Whether the square or sine waveforms employed during in vitro tests could alter the nebulizer performance compared to that observed when a patient breathes through the nebulizer is debatable. Accordingly, the aim of this in vitro study was to compare the rates of delivery from nebulizers with simulated human breathing patterns to those obtained with matching sine and square waveforms. Regular human breathing patterns with tidal volumes (VT) of approximately 40, approximately 200, approximately 500, and approximately 800 mL were selected. Sine and square waveforms that matched the VT, peak inspiratory flow rate (PIF), breathing frequency (f), and inspiratory duty cycle (t(i)/t(tot)) of the human breathing patterns were created with a breathing simulator. The rate of delivery of nebulized technetium-99m-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (99mTC-DTPA) from two different jet nebulizer brands was determined. The rate of delivery was defined as the amount of the 99mTC-DTPA deposited during 30 sec of nebulization on a filter placed between the nebulizer and the breathing simulator. The rate of delivery of 99mTC-DTPA with the human breathing pattern was similar to that measured with the matching sine or square waveforms for either nebulizer. The configuration of the breath (PIF, VT, f, t(i)/t(tot)) did, however, influence the rate of delivery. In conclusion, the shape of the waveform, in other words, one resulting from a human breathing pattern, or a matching sine or square waveform, did not influence the rate of 99mTC-DTPA delivery from a nebulizer in vitro.},
  author       = {Nikander, Kurt and Denyer, John and Smith, Nick and Wollmer, Per},
  issn         = {0894-2684},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {327--333},
  publisher    = {Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.},
  series       = {Journal of Aerosol Medicine1988-01-01+01:002007-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Breathing patterns and aerosol delivery: impact of regular human patterns, and sine and square waveforms on rate of delivery},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/089426801316970286},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2001},
}