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Gender differences in the impact of adolescent smoking on lung function and respiratory symptoms. the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, Norway, 1995-1997

Holmen, T L; Barrett-Connor, E; Clausen, J; Langhammer, A; Holmen, J and Bjermer, Leif LU (2002) In Respiratory Medicine 96(10). p.796-804
Abstract
Girls take up smoking at least as frequently as boys. Few studies have focused on gender differences in the impact of adolescent smoking. We evaluated the sex-specific effect of adolescent smoking on respiratory symptoms and lung function. All students in junior high and high schools in Nord-Trondelag County Norway, 1995-97, were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Information on smoking habits and respiratory symptoms was obtained by self-administered questionnaires. Spirometry was performed in accordance with ATS standards. Eight-thousand-three-hundred and five students (83%) completed both questionnaire and spirometry. Among 6811 students aged 13-18 years (50.3% girls) with no history of asthma, 2993 (43.9%) reported... (More)
Girls take up smoking at least as frequently as boys. Few studies have focused on gender differences in the impact of adolescent smoking. We evaluated the sex-specific effect of adolescent smoking on respiratory symptoms and lung function. All students in junior high and high schools in Nord-Trondelag County Norway, 1995-97, were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Information on smoking habits and respiratory symptoms was obtained by self-administered questionnaires. Spirometry was performed in accordance with ATS standards. Eight-thousand-three-hundred and five students (83%) completed both questionnaire and spirometry. Among 6811 students aged 13-18 years (50.3% girls) with no history of asthma, 2993 (43.9%) reported never smoking, 665 (98%) reported occasional smoking, and 667 (9.9%) reported daily smoking (mean initiation age: 13.9 years). More boys than girls were heavy smokers. In all smoking categories, smokers reported a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms than nonsmokers; symptoms increased with smoke burden. Girls reported more symptoms compared to boys with comparable smoke burden. A dose-response relation between smoking and reduced lung function was found only in girls. Girls were more vulnerable than boys to the impact of smoking on respiratory symptoms and lung function. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Respiratory Medicine
volume
96
issue
10
pages
796 - 804
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:12412979
  • scopus:0036772921
ISSN
1532-3064
DOI
10.1053/rmed.2002.1350
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0a0f421b-4636-4651-9d5a-7e0074c6aaea (old id 1123962)
date added to LUP
2008-05-23 08:28:18
date last changed
2017-09-03 04:27:23
@article{0a0f421b-4636-4651-9d5a-7e0074c6aaea,
  abstract     = {Girls take up smoking at least as frequently as boys. Few studies have focused on gender differences in the impact of adolescent smoking. We evaluated the sex-specific effect of adolescent smoking on respiratory symptoms and lung function. All students in junior high and high schools in Nord-Trondelag County Norway, 1995-97, were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Information on smoking habits and respiratory symptoms was obtained by self-administered questionnaires. Spirometry was performed in accordance with ATS standards. Eight-thousand-three-hundred and five students (83%) completed both questionnaire and spirometry. Among 6811 students aged 13-18 years (50.3% girls) with no history of asthma, 2993 (43.9%) reported never smoking, 665 (98%) reported occasional smoking, and 667 (9.9%) reported daily smoking (mean initiation age: 13.9 years). More boys than girls were heavy smokers. In all smoking categories, smokers reported a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms than nonsmokers; symptoms increased with smoke burden. Girls reported more symptoms compared to boys with comparable smoke burden. A dose-response relation between smoking and reduced lung function was found only in girls. Girls were more vulnerable than boys to the impact of smoking on respiratory symptoms and lung function.},
  author       = {Holmen, T L and Barrett-Connor, E and Clausen, J and Langhammer, A and Holmen, J and Bjermer, Leif},
  issn         = {1532-3064},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {796--804},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Respiratory Medicine},
  title        = {Gender differences in the impact of adolescent smoking on lung function and respiratory symptoms. the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, Norway, 1995-1997},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/rmed.2002.1350},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2002},
}