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Event-related potential features indexing central auditory discrimination by newborns

Ceponiene, Rita; Kushnerenko, Elena; Fellman, Vineta LU ; Renlund, Martin; Suominen, Kalervo and Naatanen, Risto (2002) In Cognitive Brain Research 13(1). p.101-113
Abstract
Behavioral research has produced little evidence on sound feature discrimination in neonates. Sensory processes underlying sound perception can be studied using the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of auditory event-related potentials (ERPs), which is not contingent on conscious perception and response. Thus, MMN is suitable for studying newborns, who are difficult to obtain behavioral responses from. The present study thus utilized spectrally rich sounds, known to elicit the most replicable MMN in adults, to investigate newborns' preattentive analysis of sound duration and frequency changes. An attempt was also made to control for the obligatory ERP effects on the MMN. Three-partial harmonic tones were presented in Duration and in... (More)
Behavioral research has produced little evidence on sound feature discrimination in neonates. Sensory processes underlying sound perception can be studied using the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of auditory event-related potentials (ERPs), which is not contingent on conscious perception and response. Thus, MMN is suitable for studying newborns, who are difficult to obtain behavioral responses from. The present study thus utilized spectrally rich sounds, known to elicit the most replicable MMN in adults, to investigate newborns' preattentive analysis of sound duration and frequency changes. An attempt was also made to control for the obligatory ERP effects on the MMN. Three-partial harmonic tones were presented in Duration and in Frequency oddball conditions to 55 newborns. In the other two, Equiprobable duration and Equiprobable frequency, conditions frequency and duration deviants of the oddball paradigms were presented with equal probabilities among sounds of other durations and frequencies. MMN was elicited in 81% of newborns in Frequency oddball condition and in 78% of newborns in Duration oddball condition. No significant amplitude differences between the duration and frequency MMNs were found, but MMN latency was delayed in Duration condition. The obligatory components seemed to contribute significantly to the deviant-standard difference in Duration but not in Frequency condition. The majority of neonates appear to possess effective sound frequency and duration discrimination mechanisms. Their preattentive sound discrimination is facilitated by spectrally rich sound content. The present findings support a change-detection nature of MMN in neonates; however, sound duration-related obligatory effects need to be taken into account in infant MMN studies. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cognitive Brain Research
volume
13
issue
1
pages
101 - 113
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:11867255
  • scopus:0036188761
ISSN
0926-6410
DOI
10.1016/S0926-6410(01)00093-3
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
2b596704-c2b6-4524-a8d6-703ba6012cc7 (old id 1124712)
date added to LUP
2008-05-20 12:49:36
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:38:47
@article{2b596704-c2b6-4524-a8d6-703ba6012cc7,
  abstract     = {Behavioral research has produced little evidence on sound feature discrimination in neonates. Sensory processes underlying sound perception can be studied using the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of auditory event-related potentials (ERPs), which is not contingent on conscious perception and response. Thus, MMN is suitable for studying newborns, who are difficult to obtain behavioral responses from. The present study thus utilized spectrally rich sounds, known to elicit the most replicable MMN in adults, to investigate newborns' preattentive analysis of sound duration and frequency changes. An attempt was also made to control for the obligatory ERP effects on the MMN. Three-partial harmonic tones were presented in Duration and in Frequency oddball conditions to 55 newborns. In the other two, Equiprobable duration and Equiprobable frequency, conditions frequency and duration deviants of the oddball paradigms were presented with equal probabilities among sounds of other durations and frequencies. MMN was elicited in 81% of newborns in Frequency oddball condition and in 78% of newborns in Duration oddball condition. No significant amplitude differences between the duration and frequency MMNs were found, but MMN latency was delayed in Duration condition. The obligatory components seemed to contribute significantly to the deviant-standard difference in Duration but not in Frequency condition. The majority of neonates appear to possess effective sound frequency and duration discrimination mechanisms. Their preattentive sound discrimination is facilitated by spectrally rich sound content. The present findings support a change-detection nature of MMN in neonates; however, sound duration-related obligatory effects need to be taken into account in infant MMN studies.},
  author       = {Ceponiene, Rita and Kushnerenko, Elena and Fellman, Vineta and Renlund, Martin and Suominen, Kalervo and Naatanen, Risto},
  issn         = {0926-6410},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {101--113},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Cognitive Brain Research},
  title        = {Event-related potential features indexing central auditory discrimination by newborns},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0926-6410(01)00093-3},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2002},
}