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The postdialytic rise in the plasma total homocysteine concentration is delayed

Arnadottir, Margret; Wingren, Kerstin; Hultberg, Björn LU and Hegbrant, Jorgen (2002) In Blood Purification 20(4). p.334-337
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: The mechanism behind the uremic hyperhomocysteinemia has not been elucidated. Possibly, dialyzable uremic toxins play a role, e.g. as enzyme inhibitors. If so, the conditions for enzymatic removal would be expected to improve after dialysis. Therefore, we studied the postdialytic pattern of the plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentration. METHODS: We collected blood samples from 19 stable, vitamin-supplemented hemodialysis patients before and at 5, 60, as well as at 480 min after a dialysis session. The patients were studied after dialysis with a low-flux dialyzer (Polyflux 6L) and a high-flux dialyzer (Polyflux 14S). RESULTS: The mean predialytic plasma tHcy concentration was 13.3 micromol/l which is considerably lower... (More)
BACKGROUND/AIMS: The mechanism behind the uremic hyperhomocysteinemia has not been elucidated. Possibly, dialyzable uremic toxins play a role, e.g. as enzyme inhibitors. If so, the conditions for enzymatic removal would be expected to improve after dialysis. Therefore, we studied the postdialytic pattern of the plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentration. METHODS: We collected blood samples from 19 stable, vitamin-supplemented hemodialysis patients before and at 5, 60, as well as at 480 min after a dialysis session. The patients were studied after dialysis with a low-flux dialyzer (Polyflux 6L) and a high-flux dialyzer (Polyflux 14S). RESULTS: The mean predialytic plasma tHcy concentration was 13.3 micromol/l which is considerably lower than the concentrations observed in our previous studies. In all patients, the plasma tHcy concentration fell during treatment with both types of dialyzers (average decrease 28 +/- 7%, p < 0.0001, and 31 +/- 8%, p < 0.0001, respectively). No postdialytic change in the plasma tHcy concentration was observed at 60 min after low-flux dialysis, however, after high-flux dialysis, the plasma tHcy concentration was significantly lower at 60 min postdialysis than at 5 min (3 +/- 8%, p < 0.05). At 480 min after dialysis, a significant postdialytic increase in the plasma tHcy concentration was found (6 +/- 9%, p < 0.01, and 11 +/- 5%, p < 0.0001, respectively) both in the case of low-flux and high-flux treatment. CONCLUSION: In the postdialytic phase, we observed a short-lived stability in the plasma tHcy concentration, and in the case of high-flux dialysis, even a slight decrease in the plasma tHcy concentration. The results support the hypothesis that dialyzable substances interfere with homocysteine removal. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Blood Purification
volume
20
issue
4
pages
334 - 337
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • pmid:12169841
  • scopus:0036061507
ISSN
0253-5068
DOI
10.1159/000063100
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b774f035-dcb9-4722-bf33-23df590d730f (old id 1124822)
date added to LUP
2008-05-16 14:46:28
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:12:56
@article{b774f035-dcb9-4722-bf33-23df590d730f,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND/AIMS: The mechanism behind the uremic hyperhomocysteinemia has not been elucidated. Possibly, dialyzable uremic toxins play a role, e.g. as enzyme inhibitors. If so, the conditions for enzymatic removal would be expected to improve after dialysis. Therefore, we studied the postdialytic pattern of the plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentration. METHODS: We collected blood samples from 19 stable, vitamin-supplemented hemodialysis patients before and at 5, 60, as well as at 480 min after a dialysis session. The patients were studied after dialysis with a low-flux dialyzer (Polyflux 6L) and a high-flux dialyzer (Polyflux 14S). RESULTS: The mean predialytic plasma tHcy concentration was 13.3 micromol/l which is considerably lower than the concentrations observed in our previous studies. In all patients, the plasma tHcy concentration fell during treatment with both types of dialyzers (average decrease 28 +/- 7%, p &lt; 0.0001, and 31 +/- 8%, p &lt; 0.0001, respectively). No postdialytic change in the plasma tHcy concentration was observed at 60 min after low-flux dialysis, however, after high-flux dialysis, the plasma tHcy concentration was significantly lower at 60 min postdialysis than at 5 min (3 +/- 8%, p &lt; 0.05). At 480 min after dialysis, a significant postdialytic increase in the plasma tHcy concentration was found (6 +/- 9%, p &lt; 0.01, and 11 +/- 5%, p &lt; 0.0001, respectively) both in the case of low-flux and high-flux treatment. CONCLUSION: In the postdialytic phase, we observed a short-lived stability in the plasma tHcy concentration, and in the case of high-flux dialysis, even a slight decrease in the plasma tHcy concentration. The results support the hypothesis that dialyzable substances interfere with homocysteine removal.},
  author       = {Arnadottir, Margret and Wingren, Kerstin and Hultberg, Björn and Hegbrant, Jorgen},
  issn         = {0253-5068},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {334--337},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Blood Purification},
  title        = {The postdialytic rise in the plasma total homocysteine concentration is delayed},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000063100},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2002},
}