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Plasmodium falciparum is able to invade erythrocytes through a trypsin-resistant pathway independent of glycophorin B

Gaur, Deepak; Storry, Jill LU ; Reid, Marion E; Barnwell, John W and Miller, Louis H (2003) In Infection and Immunity 71(12). p.6742-6746
Abstract
Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes through multiple ligand-receptor interactions, with redundancies in each pathway. One such alternate pathway is the trypsin-resistant pathway that enables P. falciparum to invade trypsin-treated erythrocytes. Previous studies have shown that this trypsin-resistant pathway is dependent on glycophorin B, as P. falciparum strains invade trypsin-digested glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes at a highly reduced efficiency. Furthermore, in a recent study, the P. falciparum 7G8 strain did not invade glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes, a finding that was not confirmed in the present study. To analyze the degree of dependence on glycophorin B for invasion by P. falciparum through the trypsin-resistant... (More)
Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes through multiple ligand-receptor interactions, with redundancies in each pathway. One such alternate pathway is the trypsin-resistant pathway that enables P. falciparum to invade trypsin-treated erythrocytes. Previous studies have shown that this trypsin-resistant pathway is dependent on glycophorin B, as P. falciparum strains invade trypsin-digested glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes at a highly reduced efficiency. Furthermore, in a recent study, the P. falciparum 7G8 strain did not invade glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes, a finding that was not confirmed in the present study. To analyze the degree of dependence on glycophorin B for invasion by P. falciparum through the trypsin-resistant pathway, we have studied the invasion phenotypes of five parasite strains, 3D7, HB3, Dd2, 7G8, and Indochina I, on trypsin-treated normal and glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes. Invasion was variably reduced in glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes. Four strains, 3D7, HB3, Dd2, and Indochina I, invaded trypsin-treated erythrocytes, while invasion by the 7G8 strain was reduced by 90%. Among the four strains, invasion by 3D7, HB3, and Dd2 of trypsin-digested glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes was further reduced. However, Indochina I invaded trypsin-digested glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes at the same efficiency as its invasion of trypsin-digested normal erythrocytes. This strongly suggests that the Indochina I strain of P. falciparum is not dependent on glycophorin B to invade through a trypsin-resistant pathway as are the strains 3D7, HB3, and Dd2. Thus, P. falciparum is able to invade erythrocytes through a glycophorin B-independent, trypsin-resistant pathway. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Infection and Immunity
volume
71
issue
12
pages
6742 - 6746
publisher
American Society for Microbiology
external identifiers
  • pmid:14638759
  • scopus:0345714791
ISSN
1098-5522
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
7a52b514-fc4a-469f-8ece-c93fa55a1129 (old id 1126496)
date added to LUP
2008-06-11 10:33:01
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:23:01
@article{7a52b514-fc4a-469f-8ece-c93fa55a1129,
  abstract     = {Plasmodium falciparum invades erythrocytes through multiple ligand-receptor interactions, with redundancies in each pathway. One such alternate pathway is the trypsin-resistant pathway that enables P. falciparum to invade trypsin-treated erythrocytes. Previous studies have shown that this trypsin-resistant pathway is dependent on glycophorin B, as P. falciparum strains invade trypsin-digested glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes at a highly reduced efficiency. Furthermore, in a recent study, the P. falciparum 7G8 strain did not invade glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes, a finding that was not confirmed in the present study. To analyze the degree of dependence on glycophorin B for invasion by P. falciparum through the trypsin-resistant pathway, we have studied the invasion phenotypes of five parasite strains, 3D7, HB3, Dd2, 7G8, and Indochina I, on trypsin-treated normal and glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes. Invasion was variably reduced in glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes. Four strains, 3D7, HB3, Dd2, and Indochina I, invaded trypsin-treated erythrocytes, while invasion by the 7G8 strain was reduced by 90%. Among the four strains, invasion by 3D7, HB3, and Dd2 of trypsin-digested glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes was further reduced. However, Indochina I invaded trypsin-digested glycophorin B-deficient erythrocytes at the same efficiency as its invasion of trypsin-digested normal erythrocytes. This strongly suggests that the Indochina I strain of P. falciparum is not dependent on glycophorin B to invade through a trypsin-resistant pathway as are the strains 3D7, HB3, and Dd2. Thus, P. falciparum is able to invade erythrocytes through a glycophorin B-independent, trypsin-resistant pathway.},
  author       = {Gaur, Deepak and Storry, Jill and Reid, Marion E and Barnwell, John W and Miller, Louis H},
  issn         = {1098-5522},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {6742--6746},
  publisher    = {American Society for Microbiology},
  series       = {Infection and Immunity},
  title        = {Plasmodium falciparum is able to invade erythrocytes through a trypsin-resistant pathway independent of glycophorin B},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {71},
  year         = {2003},
}