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Diagnostic stability in adolescent onset psychotic disorders

Jarbin, Håkan LU and von Knorring, Anne-Liis (2003) In European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 12(1). p.15-22
Abstract
The purpose was to examine the long-term stability of a diagnosis of psychotic disorder in adolescence and to focus on diagnostic change over time. A total of 88 patients with a first episode of early onset psychosis (before 19 years) were followed up an average of 10.5 years (range 5.1-18.2) after admission. This report includes the 68 patients who could be traced and interviewed with the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale and lifetime Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnosis. An initial diagnostic split between schizophrenia spectrum and affective disorder had a good (> 80 %) Positive Predictive Validity and Sensitivity. The main diagnostic shift was an influx to schizophrenia spectrum disorder (n = 6). These patients... (More)
The purpose was to examine the long-term stability of a diagnosis of psychotic disorder in adolescence and to focus on diagnostic change over time. A total of 88 patients with a first episode of early onset psychosis (before 19 years) were followed up an average of 10.5 years (range 5.1-18.2) after admission. This report includes the 68 patients who could be traced and interviewed with the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale and lifetime Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnosis. An initial diagnostic split between schizophrenia spectrum and affective disorder had a good (> 80 %) Positive Predictive Validity and Sensitivity. The main diagnostic shift was an influx to schizophrenia spectrum disorder (n = 6). These patients resembled the stable affective group (n = 27) in premorbid and prodromal aspects but changed over time to resemble the poor outcome of the stable schizophrenia spectrum group (n = 28) albeit with fewer negative symptoms and a better social function. Family history of nonaffective psychosis in first or second degree relatives was often found in the "change to schizophrenia group". A diagnosis in adolescence of schizophrenia spectrum or affective psychotic disorder is usually stable over time. A subgroup of non-schizophrenia patients go on to develop a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
bipolar disorder, diagnosis, affective disorder, schizophrenia, adolescence
in
European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
volume
12
issue
1
pages
15 - 22
publisher
Springer Medizin
external identifiers
  • pmid:12601560
  • scopus:0037226661
ISSN
1435-165X
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7b295a6f-3a61-435b-8105-4167eafcba3c (old id 1126630)
date added to LUP
2008-06-11 09:55:30
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:56:34
@article{7b295a6f-3a61-435b-8105-4167eafcba3c,
  abstract     = {The purpose was to examine the long-term stability of a diagnosis of psychotic disorder in adolescence and to focus on diagnostic change over time. A total of 88 patients with a first episode of early onset psychosis (before 19 years) were followed up an average of 10.5 years (range 5.1-18.2) after admission. This report includes the 68 patients who could be traced and interviewed with the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale and lifetime Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnosis. An initial diagnostic split between schizophrenia spectrum and affective disorder had a good (> 80 %) Positive Predictive Validity and Sensitivity. The main diagnostic shift was an influx to schizophrenia spectrum disorder (n = 6). These patients resembled the stable affective group (n = 27) in premorbid and prodromal aspects but changed over time to resemble the poor outcome of the stable schizophrenia spectrum group (n = 28) albeit with fewer negative symptoms and a better social function. Family history of nonaffective psychosis in first or second degree relatives was often found in the "change to schizophrenia group". A diagnosis in adolescence of schizophrenia spectrum or affective psychotic disorder is usually stable over time. A subgroup of non-schizophrenia patients go on to develop a schizophrenia spectrum disorder.},
  author       = {Jarbin, Håkan and von Knorring, Anne-Liis},
  issn         = {1435-165X},
  keyword      = {bipolar disorder,diagnosis,affective disorder,schizophrenia,adolescence},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {15--22},
  publisher    = {Springer Medizin},
  series       = {European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry},
  title        = {Diagnostic stability in adolescent onset psychotic disorders},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2003},
}