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Perceptual and conceptual contributions to the picture superiority effect

Stenberg, Georg LU (2003) In Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 8(Abstracts). p.50-50
Abstract
Pictures are typically better remembered than words, but explanations for this fact diverge. Some attribute picture superiority to more distinctive perceptual qualities, others to more efficient conceptual processing. In an effort to separate perceptual and conceptual factors, two groups were presented with mixed lists of pictures and words and were subsequently tested for recognition in either the original or the opposite (picture/word) format. One group, the Format Inclusion group, was instructed to endorse both formats of a studied item; the other - the Format Exclusion group - was instructed to endorse only the original format. Multinomial models were fitted to the response data, with separate parameters for a high-threshold process,... (More)
Pictures are typically better remembered than words, but explanations for this fact diverge. Some attribute picture superiority to more distinctive perceptual qualities, others to more efficient conceptual processing. In an effort to separate perceptual and conceptual factors, two groups were presented with mixed lists of pictures and words and were subsequently tested for recognition in either the original or the opposite (picture/word) format. One group, the Format Inclusion group, was instructed to endorse both formats of a studied item; the other - the Format Exclusion group - was instructed to endorse only the original format. Multinomial models were fitted to the response data, with separate parameters for a high-threshold process, recognizing items of high familiarity, and a low-threshold process, rejecting items of low familiarity. Model testing showed that both conceptual and perceptual processing was more efficient for pictures than for words. Especially the low-threshold process showed dramatic picture superiority. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society
volume
8
issue
Abstracts
pages
50 - 50
publisher
Psychonomic Society
ISSN
0090-5054
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cfc7fe9a-0735-47cb-8234-236219581944 (old id 1127316)
alternative location
http://swepub.kb.se/bib/swepub:oai:DiVA.org:hkr-661
date added to LUP
2013-10-09 14:49:45
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:45:54
@article{cfc7fe9a-0735-47cb-8234-236219581944,
  abstract     = {Pictures are typically better remembered than words, but explanations for this fact diverge. Some attribute picture superiority to more distinctive perceptual qualities, others to more efficient conceptual processing. In an effort to separate perceptual and conceptual factors, two groups were presented with mixed lists of pictures and words and were subsequently tested for recognition in either the original or the opposite (picture/word) format. One group, the Format Inclusion group, was instructed to endorse both formats of a studied item; the other - the Format Exclusion group - was instructed to endorse only the original format. Multinomial models were fitted to the response data, with separate parameters for a high-threshold process, recognizing items of high familiarity, and a low-threshold process, rejecting items of low familiarity. Model testing showed that both conceptual and perceptual processing was more efficient for pictures than for words. Especially the low-threshold process showed dramatic picture superiority.},
  author       = {Stenberg, Georg},
  issn         = {0090-5054},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Abstracts},
  pages        = {50--50},
  publisher    = {Psychonomic Society},
  series       = {Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society},
  title        = {Perceptual and conceptual contributions to the picture superiority effect},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2003},
}