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Sympathomimetic drug allergy: cross-reactivity study by patch test

Barranco, Ruth; Rodriguez, Angel; de Barrio, Manuel; Trujillo, Ma J; de Frutos, Consolacion; Matheu, Victor LU ; Tornero, Pilar and Herrero, Teresa (2004) In American Journal of Clinical Dermatology 5(5). p.351-355
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Sympathomimetic (alpha-adrenergic) drugs are mainly used because of their vasoconstrictor properties, for nasal congestion, or as mydriatics. Although sympathomimetic drugs are used often, allergic reactions are rare, especially when the drugs are administered systemically. Cross-reactivity may exist among catecholamine derivatives, although reported data on this are contradictory. In this study, we investigate if there is cross-reactivity in patch tests among these drugs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patch tests with 10% phenylephrine and 10% pseudoephedrine in petrolatum, and 10% and 20% ephedrine, 10% phenylpropanolamine, 5% fepradinol, 1% methoxamine, and 10% oxymetazoline, all administered in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), were... (More)
INTRODUCTION: Sympathomimetic (alpha-adrenergic) drugs are mainly used because of their vasoconstrictor properties, for nasal congestion, or as mydriatics. Although sympathomimetic drugs are used often, allergic reactions are rare, especially when the drugs are administered systemically. Cross-reactivity may exist among catecholamine derivatives, although reported data on this are contradictory. In this study, we investigate if there is cross-reactivity in patch tests among these drugs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patch tests with 10% phenylephrine and 10% pseudoephedrine in petrolatum, and 10% and 20% ephedrine, 10% phenylpropanolamine, 5% fepradinol, 1% methoxamine, and 10% oxymetazoline, all administered in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), were carried out in 14 patients with a history of allergy to any of these drugs. DMSO was used as the negative control. RESULTS: All patients except one (patient number five) showed positive patch-test reactions to at least two different drugs. Nine patients (64.3%) were cross-sensitized to three or more different drugs, and 57.1% of patients were sensitized to four or more sympathomimetic drugs. Patients who experienced generalized rashes caused by orally administered pseudoephedrine had a stronger response and more cross-reactivity with other sympathomimetic drugs in patch tests than those who experienced local contact dermatitis. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that there is cross-reactivity among the different sympathomimetic drugs tested, especially if the drug is administered systemically. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology
volume
5
issue
5
pages
351 - 355
publisher
Adis International
external identifiers
  • pmid:15554736
  • scopus:10644245707
ISSN
1175-0561
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
bfd028a2-8d15-4359-9397-9dd4717b926f (old id 1129110)
date added to LUP
2008-06-12 14:53:25
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:28:33
@article{bfd028a2-8d15-4359-9397-9dd4717b926f,
  abstract     = {INTRODUCTION: Sympathomimetic (alpha-adrenergic) drugs are mainly used because of their vasoconstrictor properties, for nasal congestion, or as mydriatics. Although sympathomimetic drugs are used often, allergic reactions are rare, especially when the drugs are administered systemically. Cross-reactivity may exist among catecholamine derivatives, although reported data on this are contradictory. In this study, we investigate if there is cross-reactivity in patch tests among these drugs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patch tests with 10% phenylephrine and 10% pseudoephedrine in petrolatum, and 10% and 20% ephedrine, 10% phenylpropanolamine, 5% fepradinol, 1% methoxamine, and 10% oxymetazoline, all administered in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), were carried out in 14 patients with a history of allergy to any of these drugs. DMSO was used as the negative control. RESULTS: All patients except one (patient number five) showed positive patch-test reactions to at least two different drugs. Nine patients (64.3%) were cross-sensitized to three or more different drugs, and 57.1% of patients were sensitized to four or more sympathomimetic drugs. Patients who experienced generalized rashes caused by orally administered pseudoephedrine had a stronger response and more cross-reactivity with other sympathomimetic drugs in patch tests than those who experienced local contact dermatitis. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that there is cross-reactivity among the different sympathomimetic drugs tested, especially if the drug is administered systemically.},
  author       = {Barranco, Ruth and Rodriguez, Angel and de Barrio, Manuel and Trujillo, Ma J and de Frutos, Consolacion and Matheu, Victor and Tornero, Pilar and Herrero, Teresa},
  issn         = {1175-0561},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {351--355},
  publisher    = {Adis International},
  series       = {American Journal of Clinical Dermatology},
  title        = {Sympathomimetic drug allergy: cross-reactivity study by patch test},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2004},
}