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Effects of montelukast and salmeterol on physical performance and exercise economy in adult asthmatics with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

Steinshamn, Sigurd; Sandsund, Mariann; Sue-Chu, Malcolm and Bjermer, Leif LU (2004) In Chest 126(4). p.1154-1160
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of montelukast and the long-acting beta(2)-agonist salmeterol on cardiopulmonary exercise economy and physical performance in adult patients with asthma during exercise. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: Asthmatic patients (n = 18), aged 18 to 35 years with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), using a double-blind, double-dummy cross-over design. Montelukast, 10 mg/d, was compared to inhaled salmeterol, 50 microg bid. The study medication was administered for at least 5 days prior to testing, with a washout period of at least 5 days. Treadmill exercise tests (5.3% inclination, -15 degrees C ambient temperature) were performed at work loads of 80% of maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) [6 min], rest (4 min),... (More)
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of montelukast and the long-acting beta(2)-agonist salmeterol on cardiopulmonary exercise economy and physical performance in adult patients with asthma during exercise. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: Asthmatic patients (n = 18), aged 18 to 35 years with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), using a double-blind, double-dummy cross-over design. Montelukast, 10 mg/d, was compared to inhaled salmeterol, 50 microg bid. The study medication was administered for at least 5 days prior to testing, with a washout period of at least 5 days. Treadmill exercise tests (5.3% inclination, -15 degrees C ambient temperature) were performed at work loads of 80% of maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) [6 min], rest (4 min), 60% of Vo(2)max (6 min), and finally step increments until exhaustion. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: We investigated parameters of gas exchange, physical performance, and lung function. After montelukast, the oxygen pulse was higher than after salmeterol, at 80% of Vo(2)max (p = 0.035), and 6 min at 60% of Vo(2)max (p = 0.011). Lung function during exercise, running time to exhaustion, Borg score, lactate levels, Vo(2)max, carbon dioxide elimination, minute ventilation, ventilatory equivalents, respiratory exchange ratio, and heart rate were not significantly different between the two treatments. The maximal postexercise fall in FEV(1) from baseline occurred 2 min after run to exhaustion, and was greater after salmeterol than after montelukast: mean, 16.2% (SD, 11.0) vs 10.0% (SD, 12.2) [p < 0.001]. CONCLUSIONS: In adult asthmatics with EIB, montelukast may have a more favorable effect on the oxygen pulse, thus suggesting improved gas exchange during exercise. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
lung function, gas exchange, asthma, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, exercise economy, montelukast, physical performance, salmeterol
in
Chest
volume
126
issue
4
pages
1154 - 1160
publisher
American College of Chest Physicians
external identifiers
  • pmid:15486377
  • scopus:6344280295
ISSN
1931-3543
DOI
10.1378/chest.126.4.1154
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
67254a62-0b32-4e95-8d51-06f3732478ac (old id 1129280)
date added to LUP
2008-06-18 13:52:20
date last changed
2017-08-20 04:34:54
@article{67254a62-0b32-4e95-8d51-06f3732478ac,
  abstract     = {STUDY OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of montelukast and the long-acting beta(2)-agonist salmeterol on cardiopulmonary exercise economy and physical performance in adult patients with asthma during exercise. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: Asthmatic patients (n = 18), aged 18 to 35 years with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), using a double-blind, double-dummy cross-over design. Montelukast, 10 mg/d, was compared to inhaled salmeterol, 50 microg bid. The study medication was administered for at least 5 days prior to testing, with a washout period of at least 5 days. Treadmill exercise tests (5.3% inclination, -15 degrees C ambient temperature) were performed at work loads of 80% of maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) [6 min], rest (4 min), 60% of Vo(2)max (6 min), and finally step increments until exhaustion. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: We investigated parameters of gas exchange, physical performance, and lung function. After montelukast, the oxygen pulse was higher than after salmeterol, at 80% of Vo(2)max (p = 0.035), and 6 min at 60% of Vo(2)max (p = 0.011). Lung function during exercise, running time to exhaustion, Borg score, lactate levels, Vo(2)max, carbon dioxide elimination, minute ventilation, ventilatory equivalents, respiratory exchange ratio, and heart rate were not significantly different between the two treatments. The maximal postexercise fall in FEV(1) from baseline occurred 2 min after run to exhaustion, and was greater after salmeterol than after montelukast: mean, 16.2% (SD, 11.0) vs 10.0% (SD, 12.2) [p &lt; 0.001]. CONCLUSIONS: In adult asthmatics with EIB, montelukast may have a more favorable effect on the oxygen pulse, thus suggesting improved gas exchange during exercise.},
  author       = {Steinshamn, Sigurd and Sandsund, Mariann and Sue-Chu, Malcolm and Bjermer, Leif},
  issn         = {1931-3543},
  keyword      = {lung function,gas exchange,asthma,exercise-induced bronchoconstriction,exercise economy,montelukast,physical performance,salmeterol},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1154--1160},
  publisher    = {American College of Chest Physicians},
  series       = {Chest},
  title        = {Effects of montelukast and salmeterol on physical performance and exercise economy in adult asthmatics with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1378/chest.126.4.1154},
  volume       = {126},
  year         = {2004},
}