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Neutrophils and keratinocytes in innate immunity--cooperative actions to provide antimicrobial defense at the right time and place

Borregaard, Niels; Theilgaard-Monch, Kim; Cowland, Jack B; Stahle, Mona and Sørensen, Ole E LU (2005) In Journal of Leukocyte Biology 77(4). p.439-443
Abstract
The human neutrophil is a professional phagocyte of fundamental importance for defense against microorganisms, as witnessed by the life-threatening infections occurring in patients with neutropenia or with defects that result in decreased microbicidal activity of the neutrophil. Likewise, the skin and mucosal surfaces provide important barriers against infections. Traditionally, these major defense systems, the epithelial cells and the neutrophils, have been viewed as limited in their armory: The epithelial cells provide defense by constituting a physical barrier, and the neutrophils provide instant delivery of preformed antimicrobial substances or on-the-spot assembly of the multicomponent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide... (More)
The human neutrophil is a professional phagocyte of fundamental importance for defense against microorganisms, as witnessed by the life-threatening infections occurring in patients with neutropenia or with defects that result in decreased microbicidal activity of the neutrophil. Likewise, the skin and mucosal surfaces provide important barriers against infections. Traditionally, these major defense systems, the epithelial cells and the neutrophils, have been viewed as limited in their armory: The epithelial cells provide defense by constituting a physical barrier, and the neutrophils provide instant delivery of preformed antimicrobial substances or on-the-spot assembly of the multicomponent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase from stored components for the generation of reactive oxygen metabolites. Recent research has shown that epithelial cells are highly dynamic and able to generate antimicrobial peptides in response not only to microbial infection itself but more importantly, to the growth factors that are called into play when the physical barrier is broken, and the risk of microbial infection is imminent. Likewise, the neutrophil changes its profile of actively transcribed genes when it diapedeses into wounded skin. This results in generation of signaling molecules, some of which support the growth and antimicrobial potential of keratinocytes and epithelial cells. This paper will highlight some recent advances in this field. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hCAP-18, NGAL, antibiotic peptides
in
Journal of Leukocyte Biology
volume
77
issue
4
pages
439 - 443
publisher
Society for Leukocyte Biology
external identifiers
  • pmid:15582983
  • scopus:16844363111
ISSN
1938-3673
DOI
10.1189/jlb.0704381
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
99701a4e-4daa-49a0-978e-9e4b73632ab4 (old id 1132230)
date added to LUP
2008-06-30 11:29:17
date last changed
2017-09-03 03:57:17
@article{99701a4e-4daa-49a0-978e-9e4b73632ab4,
  abstract     = {The human neutrophil is a professional phagocyte of fundamental importance for defense against microorganisms, as witnessed by the life-threatening infections occurring in patients with neutropenia or with defects that result in decreased microbicidal activity of the neutrophil. Likewise, the skin and mucosal surfaces provide important barriers against infections. Traditionally, these major defense systems, the epithelial cells and the neutrophils, have been viewed as limited in their armory: The epithelial cells provide defense by constituting a physical barrier, and the neutrophils provide instant delivery of preformed antimicrobial substances or on-the-spot assembly of the multicomponent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase from stored components for the generation of reactive oxygen metabolites. Recent research has shown that epithelial cells are highly dynamic and able to generate antimicrobial peptides in response not only to microbial infection itself but more importantly, to the growth factors that are called into play when the physical barrier is broken, and the risk of microbial infection is imminent. Likewise, the neutrophil changes its profile of actively transcribed genes when it diapedeses into wounded skin. This results in generation of signaling molecules, some of which support the growth and antimicrobial potential of keratinocytes and epithelial cells. This paper will highlight some recent advances in this field.},
  author       = {Borregaard, Niels and Theilgaard-Monch, Kim and Cowland, Jack B and Stahle, Mona and Sørensen, Ole E},
  issn         = {1938-3673},
  keyword      = {hCAP-18,NGAL,antibiotic peptides},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {439--443},
  publisher    = {Society for Leukocyte Biology},
  series       = {Journal of Leukocyte Biology},
  title        = {Neutrophils and keratinocytes in innate immunity--cooperative actions to provide antimicrobial defense at the right time and place},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1189/jlb.0704381},
  volume       = {77},
  year         = {2005},
}