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Intrauterine blood flow and postnatal development.

Ley, David LU and Marsal, Karel LU (2005) In Doppler Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology p.161-175
Abstract
Fetal experience forms the basis for postnatal life. This relationship may be obvious in the newborn infant, although it is sometimes not apparent until later in development. One fetal condition with known implications for later life is intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), which ranges from being an important factor in perinatal mortality to affecting morbidity in adulthood.

The process of growth, usually measurable as change in anatomical size, is intimately related to that of development, the latter referring to a gradual acquisition of physiological function. Dobbing defined the brain growth spurt as that transient period of growth when the brain is growing most rapidly and the period of time when the brain is most... (More)
Fetal experience forms the basis for postnatal life. This relationship may be obvious in the newborn infant, although it is sometimes not apparent until later in development. One fetal condition with known implications for later life is intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), which ranges from being an important factor in perinatal mortality to affecting morbidity in adulthood.

The process of growth, usually measurable as change in anatomical size, is intimately related to that of development, the latter referring to a gradual acquisition of physiological function. Dobbing defined the brain growth spurt as that transient period of growth when the brain is growing most rapidly and the period of time when the brain is most susceptible to adverse influence [1]. Fetal malnutrition during the brain growth spurt may reduce the number of synapses per neuron by 40% [2]. Other authors have demonstrated a lower myelin lipid content in the brain of a small-for-gestational age (SGA) newborn as compared with that of an appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA) newborn [3, 4]. In the human, a large part of the brain growth spurt takes place in the years after birth; therefore, the nutritional as well as the psychosocial environment during the first postnatal years may add to, but equally compensate for, previous adverse influence during fetal development. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Doppler Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology
pages
161 - 175
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:78349239540
ISBN
978-3-540-23088-5
DOI
10.1007/3-540-28903-8_12
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
751285ff-be15-42bf-a6e4-b50bd0206575 (old id 1134043)
date added to LUP
2008-06-17 11:44:13
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:07:59
@inbook{751285ff-be15-42bf-a6e4-b50bd0206575,
  abstract     = {Fetal experience forms the basis for postnatal life. This relationship may be obvious in the newborn infant, although it is sometimes not apparent until later in development. One fetal condition with known implications for later life is intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), which ranges from being an important factor in perinatal mortality to affecting morbidity in adulthood.<br/><br>
The process of growth, usually measurable as change in anatomical size, is intimately related to that of development, the latter referring to a gradual acquisition of physiological function. Dobbing defined the brain growth spurt as that transient period of growth when the brain is growing most rapidly and the period of time when the brain is most susceptible to adverse influence [1]. Fetal malnutrition during the brain growth spurt may reduce the number of synapses per neuron by 40% [2]. Other authors have demonstrated a lower myelin lipid content in the brain of a small-for-gestational age (SGA) newborn as compared with that of an appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA) newborn [3, 4]. In the human, a large part of the brain growth spurt takes place in the years after birth; therefore, the nutritional as well as the psychosocial environment during the first postnatal years may add to, but equally compensate for, previous adverse influence during fetal development.},
  author       = {Ley, David and Marsal, Karel},
  isbn         = {978-3-540-23088-5},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {161--175},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Doppler Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology},
  title        = {Intrauterine blood flow and postnatal development.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/3-540-28903-8_12},
  year         = {2005},
}