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Fruit and vegetable consumption and lymphoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

Rohrmann, Sabine; Becker, Nikolaus; Linseisen, Jakob; Nieters, Alexandra; Rudiger, Thomas; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Tjonneland, Anne; Johnsen, Hans E; Overvad, Kim and Kaaks, Rudolf, et al. (2007) In Cancer Causes and Control 18(5). p.537-549
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant diseases of cells of the immune system. The best-established risk factors are related to dys-regulation of immune function, and evidence suggests that factors such as dietary or lifestyle habits may be involved in the etiology. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 849 lymphoma cases were identified in a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated from validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association between fruit and vegetable intake with the risk of lymphomas overall and subentities. RESULTS: There was no overall association... (More)
INTRODUCTION: Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant diseases of cells of the immune system. The best-established risk factors are related to dys-regulation of immune function, and evidence suggests that factors such as dietary or lifestyle habits may be involved in the etiology. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 849 lymphoma cases were identified in a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated from validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association between fruit and vegetable intake with the risk of lymphomas overall and subentities. RESULTS: There was no overall association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphoma [hazard ratio (HR)=0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-1.15 comparing highest with lowest quartile]. However, the risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) tended to be lower in participants with a high intake of total vegetables (HR=0.49, 95% CI 0.23-1.02). CONCLUSION: In this large prospective study, an inverse associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphomas overall could not be confirmed. Associations with lymphoma subentities such as DLBCL warrant further investigation. (Less)
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Cancer Causes and Control
volume
18
issue
5
pages
537 - 549
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:17443415
  • scopus:34247625528
ISSN
1573-7225
DOI
10.1007/s10552-007-0125-z
language
English
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yes
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f981b954-e79a-4141-b861-e6e10204ff9f (old id 1137603)
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2008-08-15 13:44:48
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2017-03-26 04:27:00
@article{f981b954-e79a-4141-b861-e6e10204ff9f,
  abstract     = {INTRODUCTION: Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant diseases of cells of the immune system. The best-established risk factors are related to dys-regulation of immune function, and evidence suggests that factors such as dietary or lifestyle habits may be involved in the etiology. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 849 lymphoma cases were identified in a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated from validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association between fruit and vegetable intake with the risk of lymphomas overall and subentities. RESULTS: There was no overall association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphoma [hazard ratio (HR)=0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-1.15 comparing highest with lowest quartile]. However, the risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) tended to be lower in participants with a high intake of total vegetables (HR=0.49, 95% CI 0.23-1.02). CONCLUSION: In this large prospective study, an inverse associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphomas overall could not be confirmed. Associations with lymphoma subentities such as DLBCL warrant further investigation.},
  author       = {Rohrmann, Sabine and Becker, Nikolaus and Linseisen, Jakob and Nieters, Alexandra and Rudiger, Thomas and Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole and Tjonneland, Anne and Johnsen, Hans E and Overvad, Kim and Kaaks, Rudolf and Bergmann, Manuela M and Boeing, Heiner and Benetou, Vasiliki and Psaltopoulou, Theodor and Manjer, Jonas and Berglund, Göran},
  issn         = {1573-7225},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {537--549},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Cancer Causes and Control},
  title        = {Fruit and vegetable consumption and lymphoma risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-007-0125-z},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2007},
}