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Cardiovascular event risk in relation to dietary fat intake in middle-aged individuals: data from The Malmo Diet and Cancer Study

Leosdottir, Margrét LU ; Nilsson, Peter LU ; Nilsson, Jan-Ake and Berglund, Göran LU (2007) In European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation 14(5). p.701-706
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND DESIGN: The hypothesis that diets rich in total and saturated fat and poor in unsaturated fats increase the risk for cardiovascular disease is still vividly debated. The aim of this study was to examine whether total fat, saturated fat, or unsaturated fat intakes are independent risk factors for cardiovascular events in a large population-based cohort. METHODS: 28 098 middle-aged individuals (61% women) participated in the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study between 1991 and 1996. In this analysis, individuals with an earlier history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. With adjustments made for confounding by age and various anthropometric, social, dietary, and life-style factors, hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for... (More)
BACKGROUND AND DESIGN: The hypothesis that diets rich in total and saturated fat and poor in unsaturated fats increase the risk for cardiovascular disease is still vividly debated. The aim of this study was to examine whether total fat, saturated fat, or unsaturated fat intakes are independent risk factors for cardiovascular events in a large population-based cohort. METHODS: 28 098 middle-aged individuals (61% women) participated in the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study between 1991 and 1996. In this analysis, individuals with an earlier history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. With adjustments made for confounding by age and various anthropometric, social, dietary, and life-style factors, hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for individuals categorized by quartiles of fat intake [HR (95% confidence interval, CI), Cox's regression model]. RESULTS: No trend towards higher cardiovascular event risk for women or men with higher total or saturated fat intakes, was observed. Total fat: HR (95% CI) for fourth quartile was 0.98 (0.77-1.25) for women, 1.02 (0.84-1.23) for men; saturated fat: 0.98 (0.71-1.33) for women and 1.05 (0.83-1.34) for men. Inverse associations between unsaturated fat intake and cardiovascular event risk were not observed. CONCLUSIONS: In relation to risks of cardiovascular events, our results do not suggest any benefit from a limited total or saturated fat intake, nor from relatively high intake of unsaturated fat. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation
volume
14
issue
5
pages
701 - 706
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:17925631
  • wos:000254460400016
  • scopus:35048899247
ISSN
1741-8275
DOI
10.1097/HJR.0b013e3282a56c45
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2d8858cd-6ff9-4a9c-b9a7-2b648f24d718 (old id 1137648)
date added to LUP
2008-08-15 12:21:59
date last changed
2017-05-28 04:32:39
@article{2d8858cd-6ff9-4a9c-b9a7-2b648f24d718,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND AND DESIGN: The hypothesis that diets rich in total and saturated fat and poor in unsaturated fats increase the risk for cardiovascular disease is still vividly debated. The aim of this study was to examine whether total fat, saturated fat, or unsaturated fat intakes are independent risk factors for cardiovascular events in a large population-based cohort. METHODS: 28 098 middle-aged individuals (61% women) participated in the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study between 1991 and 1996. In this analysis, individuals with an earlier history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. With adjustments made for confounding by age and various anthropometric, social, dietary, and life-style factors, hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for individuals categorized by quartiles of fat intake [HR (95% confidence interval, CI), Cox's regression model]. RESULTS: No trend towards higher cardiovascular event risk for women or men with higher total or saturated fat intakes, was observed. Total fat: HR (95% CI) for fourth quartile was 0.98 (0.77-1.25) for women, 1.02 (0.84-1.23) for men; saturated fat: 0.98 (0.71-1.33) for women and 1.05 (0.83-1.34) for men. Inverse associations between unsaturated fat intake and cardiovascular event risk were not observed. CONCLUSIONS: In relation to risks of cardiovascular events, our results do not suggest any benefit from a limited total or saturated fat intake, nor from relatively high intake of unsaturated fat.},
  author       = {Leosdottir, Margrét and Nilsson, Peter and Nilsson, Jan-Ake and Berglund, Göran},
  issn         = {1741-8275},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {701--706},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Cardiovascular event risk in relation to dietary fat intake in middle-aged individuals: data from The Malmo Diet and Cancer Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJR.0b013e3282a56c45},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2007},
}