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Grafting dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease: do stem cells have a role in the future?

Li, Jia-Yi LU and Brundin, Patrik LU (2003) In Journal of Neurochemistry 85(Suppl 2). p.13-13
Abstract
Parkinson's disease (PD) patients display motor symptoms, e.g. tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia, largely due to a dramatic loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Grafts of human embryonic dopamine neurons can survive in the striatum and reduce several of the motor symptoms. Several lines of evidence suggest that a crucial threshold of surviving dopaminergic neurons must be exceeded for the grafts to become functional and relieve symptoms. A relatively small number of operations have been performed so far. The major obstacle to large clinical trials has been that tissue from large numbers of donor embryos is needed for each patient. Thus, there is definitely a need for alternative sources of donor tissue for grafting in PD.... (More)
Parkinson's disease (PD) patients display motor symptoms, e.g. tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia, largely due to a dramatic loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Grafts of human embryonic dopamine neurons can survive in the striatum and reduce several of the motor symptoms. Several lines of evidence suggest that a crucial threshold of surviving dopaminergic neurons must be exceeded for the grafts to become functional and relieve symptoms. A relatively small number of operations have been performed so far. The major obstacle to large clinical trials has been that tissue from large numbers of donor embryos is needed for each patient. Thus, there is definitely a need for alternative sources of donor tissue for grafting in PD. Clearly various forms of stem cells are interesting options. This presentation will focus the possible future use of embryonic stem cells and bone marrow stem cells as donor tissue for transplantation in PD. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Neurochemistry
volume
85
issue
Suppl 2
pages
13 - 13
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000183156200046
ISSN
1471-4159
DOI
10.1046/j.1471-4159.85.s2.13_4.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0e546ed4-d77f-41ed-bb5f-c1d5d8011813 (old id 113897)
date added to LUP
2007-07-16 14:56:25
date last changed
2016-04-16 04:06:00
@article{0e546ed4-d77f-41ed-bb5f-c1d5d8011813,
  abstract     = {Parkinson's disease (PD) patients display motor symptoms, e.g. tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia, largely due to a dramatic loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Grafts of human embryonic dopamine neurons can survive in the striatum and reduce several of the motor symptoms. Several lines of evidence suggest that a crucial threshold of surviving dopaminergic neurons must be exceeded for the grafts to become functional and relieve symptoms. A relatively small number of operations have been performed so far. The major obstacle to large clinical trials has been that tissue from large numbers of donor embryos is needed for each patient. Thus, there is definitely a need for alternative sources of donor tissue for grafting in PD. Clearly various forms of stem cells are interesting options. This presentation will focus the possible future use of embryonic stem cells and bone marrow stem cells as donor tissue for transplantation in PD.},
  author       = {Li, Jia-Yi and Brundin, Patrik},
  issn         = {1471-4159},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Suppl 2},
  pages        = {13--13},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Neurochemistry},
  title        = {Grafting dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease: do stem cells have a role in the future?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1471-4159.85.s2.13_4.x},
  volume       = {85},
  year         = {2003},
}