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Transit of blood flow through the human left ventricle mapped by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

Bolger, Ann F; Heiberg, Einar LU ; Karlsson, Matts; Wigstrom, Lars; Engvall, Jan; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Ebbers, Tino; Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar; Carlhall, Carl Johan and Wranne, Bengt (2007) In Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 9(5). p.741-747
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The transit of blood through the beating heart is a basic aspect of cardiovascular physiology which remains incompletely studied. Quantification of the components of multidirectional flow in the normal left ventricle (LV) is lacking, making it difficult to put the changes observed with LV dysfunction and cardiac surgery into context. METHODS: Three dimensional, three directional, time resolved magnetic resonance phase-contrast velocity mapping was performed at 1.5 Tesla in 17 normal subjects, 6 female, aged 44+/-14 years (mean+/-SD). We visualized and measured the relative volumes of LV flow components and the diastolic changes in inflowing kinetic energy (KE). Of total diastolic inflow volume, 44+/-11% followed a direct,... (More)
BACKGROUND: The transit of blood through the beating heart is a basic aspect of cardiovascular physiology which remains incompletely studied. Quantification of the components of multidirectional flow in the normal left ventricle (LV) is lacking, making it difficult to put the changes observed with LV dysfunction and cardiac surgery into context. METHODS: Three dimensional, three directional, time resolved magnetic resonance phase-contrast velocity mapping was performed at 1.5 Tesla in 17 normal subjects, 6 female, aged 44+/-14 years (mean+/-SD). We visualized and measured the relative volumes of LV flow components and the diastolic changes in inflowing kinetic energy (KE). Of total diastolic inflow volume, 44+/-11% followed a direct, albeit curved route to systolic ejection (videos 1 and 2), in contrast to 11% in a subject with mildly dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), who was included for preliminary comparison (video 3). In normals, 16+/-8% of the KE of inflow was conserved to the end of diastole, compared with 5% in the DCM patient. Blood following the direct route lost or transferred less of its KE during diastole than blood that was retained until the next beat (1.6+/-1.0 millijoules vs 8.2+/-1.9 millijoules, p<0.05); whereas, in the DCM patient, the reduction in KE of retained inflow was 18-fold greater than that of the blood tracing the direct route. CONCLUSION: Multidimensional flow mapping can measure the paths, compartmentalization and kinetic energy changes of blood flowing into the LV, demonstrating differences of KE loss between compartments, and potentially between the flows in normal and dilated left ventricles. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance
volume
9
issue
5
pages
741 - 747
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • pmid:17891610
  • scopus:34648815779
ISSN
1097-6647
DOI
10.1080/10976640701544530
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
84074cd6-2441-429c-bec3-95aced5b4a4f (old id 1139072)
date added to LUP
2008-08-19 11:53:36
date last changed
2017-11-12 04:09:16
@article{84074cd6-2441-429c-bec3-95aced5b4a4f,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The transit of blood through the beating heart is a basic aspect of cardiovascular physiology which remains incompletely studied. Quantification of the components of multidirectional flow in the normal left ventricle (LV) is lacking, making it difficult to put the changes observed with LV dysfunction and cardiac surgery into context. METHODS: Three dimensional, three directional, time resolved magnetic resonance phase-contrast velocity mapping was performed at 1.5 Tesla in 17 normal subjects, 6 female, aged 44+/-14 years (mean+/-SD). We visualized and measured the relative volumes of LV flow components and the diastolic changes in inflowing kinetic energy (KE). Of total diastolic inflow volume, 44+/-11% followed a direct, albeit curved route to systolic ejection (videos 1 and 2), in contrast to 11% in a subject with mildly dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), who was included for preliminary comparison (video 3). In normals, 16+/-8% of the KE of inflow was conserved to the end of diastole, compared with 5% in the DCM patient. Blood following the direct route lost or transferred less of its KE during diastole than blood that was retained until the next beat (1.6+/-1.0 millijoules vs 8.2+/-1.9 millijoules, p&lt;0.05); whereas, in the DCM patient, the reduction in KE of retained inflow was 18-fold greater than that of the blood tracing the direct route. CONCLUSION: Multidimensional flow mapping can measure the paths, compartmentalization and kinetic energy changes of blood flowing into the LV, demonstrating differences of KE loss between compartments, and potentially between the flows in normal and dilated left ventricles.},
  author       = {Bolger, Ann F and Heiberg, Einar and Karlsson, Matts and Wigstrom, Lars and Engvall, Jan and Sigfridsson, Andreas and Ebbers, Tino and Kvitting, John-Peder Escobar and Carlhall, Carl Johan and Wranne, Bengt},
  issn         = {1097-6647},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {741--747},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance},
  title        = {Transit of blood flow through the human left ventricle mapped by cardiovascular magnetic resonance},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10976640701544530},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2007},
}