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Satisfaction with rollators among community-living users: a follow-up study.

Brandt, Åse LU ; Iwarsson, Susanne LU and Ståhl, Agneta LU (2003) In Disability and Rehabilitation 25(7). p.343-353
Abstract
Purpose: Rollators are used in order to make mobility possible for people with restricted walking ability. The use of rollators is increasing, but little is known about outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate users' satisfaction with rollators. Method: A follow-up study was carried out in seven Danish municipalities. One month after they got their device, 89 users of rollators were interviewed by means of the QUEST 1.0. Three months after the first interview a second interview took place and data from the 64 users available for follow-up were analysed. Results: The users were satisfied with their rollators, and the frequency of use was high. However, many of the users were frail, and some of them were not fully satisfied in all... (More)
Purpose: Rollators are used in order to make mobility possible for people with restricted walking ability. The use of rollators is increasing, but little is known about outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate users' satisfaction with rollators. Method: A follow-up study was carried out in seven Danish municipalities. One month after they got their device, 89 users of rollators were interviewed by means of the QUEST 1.0. Three months after the first interview a second interview took place and data from the 64 users available for follow-up were analysed. Results: The users were satisfied with their rollators, and the frequency of use was high. However, many of the users were frail, and some of them were not fully satisfied in all respects. Women especially, users living alone and first time users were likely to be dissatisfied. The main problem identified was handling the rollator, and for several users the physical environment caused accessibility problems. Conclusions: Rollators are valuable for the users and a relevant societal intervention. However, a better match between person and technology, enhanced user training and follow-up can improve the outcome of the intervention. Furthermore, better rollator design is called for, and buses and the outdoor environment need to be made more accessible. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Disability and Rehabilitation
volume
25
issue
7
pages
343 - 353
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000183010500006
  • pmid:12745958
  • scopus:0037799628
ISSN
0963-8288
DOI
10.1080/0963828021000058495
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2fdc11cb-37cf-4689-8f3a-e957a6cfb625 (old id 114076)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12745958&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-12 13:00:31
date last changed
2018-09-02 03:30:43
@article{2fdc11cb-37cf-4689-8f3a-e957a6cfb625,
  abstract     = {Purpose: Rollators are used in order to make mobility possible for people with restricted walking ability. The use of rollators is increasing, but little is known about outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate users' satisfaction with rollators. Method: A follow-up study was carried out in seven Danish municipalities. One month after they got their device, 89 users of rollators were interviewed by means of the QUEST 1.0. Three months after the first interview a second interview took place and data from the 64 users available for follow-up were analysed. Results: The users were satisfied with their rollators, and the frequency of use was high. However, many of the users were frail, and some of them were not fully satisfied in all respects. Women especially, users living alone and first time users were likely to be dissatisfied. The main problem identified was handling the rollator, and for several users the physical environment caused accessibility problems. Conclusions: Rollators are valuable for the users and a relevant societal intervention. However, a better match between person and technology, enhanced user training and follow-up can improve the outcome of the intervention. Furthermore, better rollator design is called for, and buses and the outdoor environment need to be made more accessible.},
  author       = {Brandt, Åse and Iwarsson, Susanne and Ståhl, Agneta},
  issn         = {0963-8288},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {343--353},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Disability and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Satisfaction with rollators among community-living users: a follow-up study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0963828021000058495},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2003},
}