Advanced

Circulating Tumor Cell Number and Prognosis in Progressive Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

Danila, DC; Heller, G; Gignac, GA; Gonzalez-Espinoza, R; Anand, Aseem LU ; Tanaka, E; Lilja, Hans; Schwartz, L; Larson, S and Fleisher, M, et al. (2007) In Clinical Cancer Research 13(23). p.7053-7058
Abstract
PURPOSE: The development of tumor-specific markers to select targeted therapies and to assess clinical outcome remains a significant area of unmet need. We evaluated the association of baseline circulating tumor cell (CTC) number with clinical characteristics and survival in patients with castrate metastatic disease considered for different hormonal and cytotoxic therapies. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: CTC were isolated by immunomagnetic capture from 7.5-mL samples of blood from 120 patients with progressive clinical castrate metastatic disease. We estimated the probability of survival over time by the Kaplan-Meier method. The concordance probability estimate was used to gauge the discriminatory strength of the informative prognostic factors.... (More)
PURPOSE: The development of tumor-specific markers to select targeted therapies and to assess clinical outcome remains a significant area of unmet need. We evaluated the association of baseline circulating tumor cell (CTC) number with clinical characteristics and survival in patients with castrate metastatic disease considered for different hormonal and cytotoxic therapies. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: CTC were isolated by immunomagnetic capture from 7.5-mL samples of blood from 120 patients with progressive clinical castrate metastatic disease. We estimated the probability of survival over time by the Kaplan-Meier method. The concordance probability estimate was used to gauge the discriminatory strength of the informative prognostic factors. RESULTS: Sixty-nine (57%) patients had five or more CTC whereas 30 (25%) had two cells or less. Higher CTC numbers were observed in patients with bone metastases relative to those with soft tissue disease and in patients who had received prior cytotoxic chemotherapy relative to those who had not. CTC counts were modestly correlated to measurements of tumor burden such as prostate-specific antigen and bone scan index, reflecting the percentage of boney skeleton involved with tumor. Baseline CTC number was strongly associated with survival, without a threshold effect, which increased further when baseline prostate-specific antigen and albumin were included. CONCLUSIONS: Baseline CTC was predictive of survival, with no threshold effect. The shedding of cells into the circulation represents an intrinsic property of the tumor, distinct from extent of disease, and provides unique information relative to prognosis. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
, et al. (More)
(Less)
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Cancer Research
volume
13
issue
23
pages
7053 - 7058
publisher
American Association for Cancer Research
external identifiers
  • pmid:18056182
  • scopus:37249006715
ISSN
1078-0432
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-07-1506
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9e62c4ba-9e45-4529-abbb-869f6165a628 (old id 1141182)
date added to LUP
2008-08-13 11:57:28
date last changed
2017-11-12 04:05:57
@article{9e62c4ba-9e45-4529-abbb-869f6165a628,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: The development of tumor-specific markers to select targeted therapies and to assess clinical outcome remains a significant area of unmet need. We evaluated the association of baseline circulating tumor cell (CTC) number with clinical characteristics and survival in patients with castrate metastatic disease considered for different hormonal and cytotoxic therapies. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: CTC were isolated by immunomagnetic capture from 7.5-mL samples of blood from 120 patients with progressive clinical castrate metastatic disease. We estimated the probability of survival over time by the Kaplan-Meier method. The concordance probability estimate was used to gauge the discriminatory strength of the informative prognostic factors. RESULTS: Sixty-nine (57%) patients had five or more CTC whereas 30 (25%) had two cells or less. Higher CTC numbers were observed in patients with bone metastases relative to those with soft tissue disease and in patients who had received prior cytotoxic chemotherapy relative to those who had not. CTC counts were modestly correlated to measurements of tumor burden such as prostate-specific antigen and bone scan index, reflecting the percentage of boney skeleton involved with tumor. Baseline CTC number was strongly associated with survival, without a threshold effect, which increased further when baseline prostate-specific antigen and albumin were included. CONCLUSIONS: Baseline CTC was predictive of survival, with no threshold effect. The shedding of cells into the circulation represents an intrinsic property of the tumor, distinct from extent of disease, and provides unique information relative to prognosis.},
  author       = {Danila, DC and Heller, G and Gignac, GA and Gonzalez-Espinoza, R and Anand, Aseem and Tanaka, E and Lilja, Hans and Schwartz, L and Larson, S and Fleisher, M and Scher, HI},
  issn         = {1078-0432},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {23},
  pages        = {7053--7058},
  publisher    = {American Association for Cancer Research},
  series       = {Clinical Cancer Research},
  title        = {Circulating Tumor Cell Number and Prognosis in Progressive Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-07-1506},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2007},
}