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Self reported skin morbidity and ethnicity: a population-based study in a Western community

Dahlgard, F; Holm, J; Svensson, Åke LU ; Kumar, B and Sundby, J (2007) In BMC Dermtology 7.
Abstract
Background



Recent studies have shown ethnic differences concerning cardio-vascular disease, diabetes and mental health. Little is known about ethnic differences in skin morbidity. The purpose of this study was to describe possible ethnic differences in self-reported skin morbidity in a Western urban community.

Methods



The design was cross sectional. 40 888 adults in Oslo, Norway, received a postal questionnaire providing information on socio-demographic factors and self-reported health, including items on skin complaints.

Results



18770 individuals answered the questionnaire. In the sample 84% were from Norway. The largest immigrant group was from Western countries... (More)
Background



Recent studies have shown ethnic differences concerning cardio-vascular disease, diabetes and mental health. Little is known about ethnic differences in skin morbidity. The purpose of this study was to describe possible ethnic differences in self-reported skin morbidity in a Western urban community.

Methods



The design was cross sectional. 40 888 adults in Oslo, Norway, received a postal questionnaire providing information on socio-demographic factors and self-reported health, including items on skin complaints.

Results



18770 individuals answered the questionnaire. In the sample 84% were from Norway. The largest immigrant group was from Western countries (5%) and the Indian Subcontinent (3%). Itch was the most prevalent reported skin symptom (7%), and was significantly more reported by men from East Asia (18%) and Middle East/North Africa (13%). The same observations were seen for reported dry and sore skin. Hair loss was a dominating complaint for men from the Indian Subcontinent and the Middle East/North Africa (23% and 25%) and for women from the same ethnic groups. Women from Sub-Saharan Africa reported significantly more pimples than in the other groups (17%).

Conclusion



The study showed that there were significant differences in self-reported skin complaints among ethnic groups. Issues concerning the cultural value of some skin symptoms should be examined further.

Background (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BMC Dermtology
volume
7
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:34547163851
DOI
10.1186/1471-5945-7-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
efe6b2e2-19c5-443b-8035-014301717e7a (old id 1142467)
date added to LUP
2008-08-06 15:55:42
date last changed
2017-07-09 04:41:05
@article{efe6b2e2-19c5-443b-8035-014301717e7a,
  abstract     = {Background<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Recent studies have shown ethnic differences concerning cardio-vascular disease, diabetes and mental health. Little is known about ethnic differences in skin morbidity. The purpose of this study was to describe possible ethnic differences in self-reported skin morbidity in a Western urban community.<br/><br>
Methods<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The design was cross sectional. 40 888 adults in Oslo, Norway, received a postal questionnaire providing information on socio-demographic factors and self-reported health, including items on skin complaints.<br/><br>
Results<br/><br>
<br/><br>
18770 individuals answered the questionnaire. In the sample 84% were from Norway. The largest immigrant group was from Western countries (5%) and the Indian Subcontinent (3%). Itch was the most prevalent reported skin symptom (7%), and was significantly more reported by men from East Asia (18%) and Middle East/North Africa (13%). The same observations were seen for reported dry and sore skin. Hair loss was a dominating complaint for men from the Indian Subcontinent and the Middle East/North Africa (23% and 25%) and for women from the same ethnic groups. Women from Sub-Saharan Africa reported significantly more pimples than in the other groups (17%).<br/><br>
Conclusion<br/><br>
<br/><br>
The study showed that there were significant differences in self-reported skin complaints among ethnic groups. Issues concerning the cultural value of some skin symptoms should be examined further.<br/><br>
Background},
  articleno    = {4},
  author       = {Dahlgard, F and Holm, J and Svensson, Åke and Kumar, B and Sundby, J},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Dermtology},
  title        = {Self reported skin morbidity and ethnicity: a population-based study in a Western community},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-5945-7-4},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2007},
}