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Risky use of alcohol, drugs and cigarettes in a psychosis unit: a 1 1/2 year follow-up of stability and changes after initial screening

Cruce, Gunilla LU and Öjehagen, Agneta LU (2007) In BMC Psychiatry 7.
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Co-morbidity with substance use disorders negatively influences overall functioning in patients with psychosis. However, frequencies and courses of risky use of alcohol, drugs and cigarettes are rarely investigated in patients at psychosis units.The purpose of this study is to describe the use of alcohol, drugs and cigarettes in patients at a psychosis unit over a 1 1/2 year period after them having taken part in a screening investigation including a feed-back of the results to personnel. Relationships with sex and age are also described. METHODS: The patients' use of the substances was examined at baseline and at follow-up using three self-reporting instruments: Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), Drug Use... (More)
BACKGROUND: Co-morbidity with substance use disorders negatively influences overall functioning in patients with psychosis. However, frequencies and courses of risky use of alcohol, drugs and cigarettes are rarely investigated in patients at psychosis units.The purpose of this study is to describe the use of alcohol, drugs and cigarettes in patients at a psychosis unit over a 1 1/2 year period after them having taken part in a screening investigation including a feed-back of the results to personnel. Relationships with sex and age are also described. METHODS: The patients' use of the substances was examined at baseline and at follow-up using three self-reporting instruments: Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) and Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). RESULTS: One hundred and eighty-six patients out of 238 at baseline (78 percent) took part in the follow-up. Total AUDIT score decreased in women. Older men more often developed a risky alcohol use. Older women tended to reduce their risky drug habits. On a group level the habits mostly were stable, but 11 percent changed their alcohol habits and 15 percent changed their smoking habits from risky to no/low risky use, or vice versa. Nine percent changed their drug habits, predominantly from risky to no/low risky use. CONCLUSION: A more active approach towards alcohol, drug and smoking habits in psychosis units would probably be beneficial. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BMC Psychiatry
volume
7
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • pmid:17617890
  • scopus:34548732397
ISSN
1471-244X
DOI
10.1186/1471-244X-7-31
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ede83733-fbbf-47b6-85b9-67fea3ad99c6 (old id 1143152)
date added to LUP
2008-07-31 10:13:19
date last changed
2017-07-09 04:23:11
@article{ede83733-fbbf-47b6-85b9-67fea3ad99c6,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Co-morbidity with substance use disorders negatively influences overall functioning in patients with psychosis. However, frequencies and courses of risky use of alcohol, drugs and cigarettes are rarely investigated in patients at psychosis units.The purpose of this study is to describe the use of alcohol, drugs and cigarettes in patients at a psychosis unit over a 1 1/2 year period after them having taken part in a screening investigation including a feed-back of the results to personnel. Relationships with sex and age are also described. METHODS: The patients' use of the substances was examined at baseline and at follow-up using three self-reporting instruments: Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), Drug Use Disorders Identification Test (DUDIT) and Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). RESULTS: One hundred and eighty-six patients out of 238 at baseline (78 percent) took part in the follow-up. Total AUDIT score decreased in women. Older men more often developed a risky alcohol use. Older women tended to reduce their risky drug habits. On a group level the habits mostly were stable, but 11 percent changed their alcohol habits and 15 percent changed their smoking habits from risky to no/low risky use, or vice versa. Nine percent changed their drug habits, predominantly from risky to no/low risky use. CONCLUSION: A more active approach towards alcohol, drug and smoking habits in psychosis units would probably be beneficial.},
  articleno    = {31},
  author       = {Cruce, Gunilla and Öjehagen, Agneta},
  issn         = {1471-244X},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Psychiatry},
  title        = {Risky use of alcohol, drugs and cigarettes in a psychosis unit: a 1 1/2 year follow-up of stability and changes after initial screening},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-7-31},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2007},
}