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Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and FGF receptor 3 are required for the development of the substantia nigra, and FGF-2 plays a crucial role for the rescue of dopaminergic neurons after 6-hydroxydopamine lesion

Timmer, Marco; Cesnulevicius, Konstantin; Winkler, Christian LU ; Kolb, Julia; Lipokatic-Takacs, Esther; Jungnickel, Julia and Grothe, Claudia (2007) In Journal of Neuroscience 27(3). p.459-471
Abstract
Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) is involved in the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Exogenous administration of FGF-2 increased dopaminergic (DA) graft survival in different animal models of Parkinson's disease. To study the physiological function of the endogenous FGF-2 system, we analyzed the nigrostriatal system of mice lacking FGF-2, mice overexpressing FGF-2, and FGF-receptor-3 (FGFR3)-deficient mice both after development and after 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. FGFR3-deficient mice (+/-) displayed a reduced number of DA neurons compared with the respective wild type. Whereas absence of FGF-2 led to significantly increased numbers of DA neurons, enhanced amount of the growth factor in mice overexpressing FGF-2... (More)
Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) is involved in the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Exogenous administration of FGF-2 increased dopaminergic (DA) graft survival in different animal models of Parkinson's disease. To study the physiological function of the endogenous FGF-2 system, we analyzed the nigrostriatal system of mice lacking FGF-2, mice overexpressing FGF-2, and FGF-receptor-3 (FGFR3)-deficient mice both after development and after 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. FGFR3-deficient mice (+/-) displayed a reduced number of DA neurons compared with the respective wild type. Whereas absence of FGF-2 led to significantly increased numbers of DA neurons, enhanced amount of the growth factor in mice overexpressing FGF-2 resulted in less tyrosine hydroxylase expression and a reduced DA cell density. The volumes of the substantia nigra were enlarged in both FGF-2(-/-) and in FGF-2 transgenic mice, suggesting an important role of FGF-2 for the establishment of the proper number of DA neurons and a normal sized substantia nigra during development. In a second set of experiments, the putative relevance of endogenous FGF-2 after neurotoxin application was investigated regarding the number of rescued DA neurons after partial 6-OHDA lesion. Interestingly, the results after lesion were directly opposed to the results after development: significantly less DA neurons survived in FGF-2(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. Together, the results indicate that FGFR3 is crucially involved in regulating the number of DA neurons. The lack of FGF-2 seems to be (over)compensated during development, but, after lesion, compensation mechanisms fail. The transgenic mice showed that endogenous FGF-2 protects DA neurons from 6-OHDA neurotoxicity. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Neuroscience
volume
27
issue
3
pages
459 - 471
publisher
Society for Neuroscience
external identifiers
  • pmid:17234579
  • scopus:33846436077
ISSN
1529-2401
DOI
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4493-06.2007
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
de9d6647-53bf-49e6-ad14-1a71a9fa5b2a (old id 1143437)
date added to LUP
2008-07-30 13:19:43
date last changed
2017-08-13 04:26:41
@article{de9d6647-53bf-49e6-ad14-1a71a9fa5b2a,
  abstract     = {Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) is involved in the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Exogenous administration of FGF-2 increased dopaminergic (DA) graft survival in different animal models of Parkinson's disease. To study the physiological function of the endogenous FGF-2 system, we analyzed the nigrostriatal system of mice lacking FGF-2, mice overexpressing FGF-2, and FGF-receptor-3 (FGFR3)-deficient mice both after development and after 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. FGFR3-deficient mice (+/-) displayed a reduced number of DA neurons compared with the respective wild type. Whereas absence of FGF-2 led to significantly increased numbers of DA neurons, enhanced amount of the growth factor in mice overexpressing FGF-2 resulted in less tyrosine hydroxylase expression and a reduced DA cell density. The volumes of the substantia nigra were enlarged in both FGF-2(-/-) and in FGF-2 transgenic mice, suggesting an important role of FGF-2 for the establishment of the proper number of DA neurons and a normal sized substantia nigra during development. In a second set of experiments, the putative relevance of endogenous FGF-2 after neurotoxin application was investigated regarding the number of rescued DA neurons after partial 6-OHDA lesion. Interestingly, the results after lesion were directly opposed to the results after development: significantly less DA neurons survived in FGF-2(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. Together, the results indicate that FGFR3 is crucially involved in regulating the number of DA neurons. The lack of FGF-2 seems to be (over)compensated during development, but, after lesion, compensation mechanisms fail. The transgenic mice showed that endogenous FGF-2 protects DA neurons from 6-OHDA neurotoxicity.},
  author       = {Timmer, Marco and Cesnulevicius, Konstantin and Winkler, Christian and Kolb, Julia and Lipokatic-Takacs, Esther and Jungnickel, Julia and Grothe, Claudia},
  issn         = {1529-2401},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {459--471},
  publisher    = {Society for Neuroscience},
  series       = {Journal of Neuroscience},
  title        = {Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and FGF receptor 3 are required for the development of the substantia nigra, and FGF-2 plays a crucial role for the rescue of dopaminergic neurons after 6-hydroxydopamine lesion},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4493-06.2007},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2007},
}