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Antibacterial chemokines - actors in both innate and adaptive immunity.

Eliasson, Mette and Egesten, Arne LU (2008) In Contributions to Microbiology 15. p.101-117
Abstract
Several antibacterial proteins and peptides of the human innate immune system have additional roles in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Among peptides with innate and adaptive immune functions are chemokines, a family of structurally related peptides with conserved amino-terminal motifs. Chemokines regulate leukocyte trafficking during both health and disease. In recent years, some chemokines have been shown to exert direct antibacterial activity. On the other hand, several granulebound antibacterial proteins of granulocytes, and epithelium-expressed antibacterial polypeptides, possess chemotactic activity and stimulate cells of the adaptive immune system. It is likely that during evolution, some antimicrobial peptides and... (More)
Several antibacterial proteins and peptides of the human innate immune system have additional roles in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Among peptides with innate and adaptive immune functions are chemokines, a family of structurally related peptides with conserved amino-terminal motifs. Chemokines regulate leukocyte trafficking during both health and disease. In recent years, some chemokines have been shown to exert direct antibacterial activity. On the other hand, several granulebound antibacterial proteins of granulocytes, and epithelium-expressed antibacterial polypeptides, possess chemotactic activity and stimulate cells of the adaptive immune system. It is likely that during evolution, some antimicrobial peptides and proteins of innate immunity have diverged to coordinate the actions of the innate immune system and the evolutionary younger, adaptive immunity. This review aims to describe antibacterial chemokines and antibacterial peptides possessing chemotactic activity, biologic properties that link innate and adaptive immunity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Contributions to Microbiology
volume
15
pages
101 - 117
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • pmid:18511858
  • scopus:49449114876
ISSN
1420-9519
DOI
10.1159/000136317
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
07a8d0e1-a0df-4801-837f-662e01c418d3 (old id 1153666)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18511858?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-06-02 10:27:51
date last changed
2017-10-01 05:03:17
@article{07a8d0e1-a0df-4801-837f-662e01c418d3,
  abstract     = {Several antibacterial proteins and peptides of the human innate immune system have additional roles in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Among peptides with innate and adaptive immune functions are chemokines, a family of structurally related peptides with conserved amino-terminal motifs. Chemokines regulate leukocyte trafficking during both health and disease. In recent years, some chemokines have been shown to exert direct antibacterial activity. On the other hand, several granulebound antibacterial proteins of granulocytes, and epithelium-expressed antibacterial polypeptides, possess chemotactic activity and stimulate cells of the adaptive immune system. It is likely that during evolution, some antimicrobial peptides and proteins of innate immunity have diverged to coordinate the actions of the innate immune system and the evolutionary younger, adaptive immunity. This review aims to describe antibacterial chemokines and antibacterial peptides possessing chemotactic activity, biologic properties that link innate and adaptive immunity.},
  author       = {Eliasson, Mette and Egesten, Arne},
  issn         = {1420-9519},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {101--117},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Contributions to Microbiology},
  title        = {Antibacterial chemokines - actors in both innate and adaptive immunity.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000136317},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2008},
}