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Wireless Esophageal pH Monitoring in Children.

Gunnarsdottir, Anna LU ; Stenström, Pernilla LU and Arnbjörnsson, Einar LU (2008) In Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques. Part A 18(3). p.443-447
Abstract
ABSTRACT Introduction: A wireless BRAVO() (Medtronic, Shoreview, MN) capsule for pH measurement in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is intended to be less uncomfortable, and facilitates activity during the measuring period, compared to the usual method with a naso-esophageal catheter. The aim of this study was to report on our experience with the wireless system in children. A secondary aim was to see if there was any cut-off level for esophageal acid exposure causing esophagitis as verified by pathologic examination. Materials and Methods: A total of 62 wireless 24-hour pH measurements with the BRAVO capsule were carried out over a period of 2 years in 58 children with symptoms of GERD. The median age of the... (More)
ABSTRACT Introduction: A wireless BRAVO() (Medtronic, Shoreview, MN) capsule for pH measurement in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is intended to be less uncomfortable, and facilitates activity during the measuring period, compared to the usual method with a naso-esophageal catheter. The aim of this study was to report on our experience with the wireless system in children. A secondary aim was to see if there was any cut-off level for esophageal acid exposure causing esophagitis as verified by pathologic examination. Materials and Methods: A total of 62 wireless 24-hour pH measurements with the BRAVO capsule were carried out over a period of 2 years in 58 children with symptoms of GERD. The median age of the children was 8 +/- 4 years (range, 1-15). They underwent upper endoscopies and the placement of the capsule under general anesthesia. Correlations between endoscope findings and pathologic diagnosis were done. Results: In 10 children, the endoscopies showed esophagitis. The median percent time of pH <4 was 7.0 +/- 9.6% (range, 0-61). The DeMeester score was abnormally high in 33 children. Three children described dysphagia during the measuring time. In 3 patients, we experienced technical problems with the wireless system. Biopsies were taken in 49 children, of which 18 showed esophagitis, with no correlation to the 24-hour pH-measurement findings. Conclusions: Ambulatory pH monitoring, using the wireless pH system, is feasible and was well tolerated by the children. No cut-off level for the acid exposure in correlation to pathologic diagnosis of esophagitis could be found. We recommend the use of the wireless pH-measurement system in children. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques. Part A
volume
18
issue
3
pages
443 - 447
publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000256907400018
  • pmid:18503382
  • scopus:44349149245
ISSN
1557-9034
DOI
10.1089/lap.2007.0191
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d6d00e13-83dc-4609-9a16-53e9dac2f0ba (old id 1153766)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18503382?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-06-03 11:08:34
date last changed
2017-02-05 04:33:46
@article{d6d00e13-83dc-4609-9a16-53e9dac2f0ba,
  abstract     = {ABSTRACT Introduction: A wireless BRAVO() (Medtronic, Shoreview, MN) capsule for pH measurement in the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is intended to be less uncomfortable, and facilitates activity during the measuring period, compared to the usual method with a naso-esophageal catheter. The aim of this study was to report on our experience with the wireless system in children. A secondary aim was to see if there was any cut-off level for esophageal acid exposure causing esophagitis as verified by pathologic examination. Materials and Methods: A total of 62 wireless 24-hour pH measurements with the BRAVO capsule were carried out over a period of 2 years in 58 children with symptoms of GERD. The median age of the children was 8 +/- 4 years (range, 1-15). They underwent upper endoscopies and the placement of the capsule under general anesthesia. Correlations between endoscope findings and pathologic diagnosis were done. Results: In 10 children, the endoscopies showed esophagitis. The median percent time of pH &lt;4 was 7.0 +/- 9.6% (range, 0-61). The DeMeester score was abnormally high in 33 children. Three children described dysphagia during the measuring time. In 3 patients, we experienced technical problems with the wireless system. Biopsies were taken in 49 children, of which 18 showed esophagitis, with no correlation to the 24-hour pH-measurement findings. Conclusions: Ambulatory pH monitoring, using the wireless pH system, is feasible and was well tolerated by the children. No cut-off level for the acid exposure in correlation to pathologic diagnosis of esophagitis could be found. We recommend the use of the wireless pH-measurement system in children.},
  author       = {Gunnarsdottir, Anna and Stenström, Pernilla and Arnbjörnsson, Einar},
  issn         = {1557-9034},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {443--447},
  publisher    = {Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.},
  series       = {Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques. Part A},
  title        = {Wireless Esophageal pH Monitoring in Children.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/lap.2007.0191},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2008},
}