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A short review on SSF - an interesting process option for ethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstocks.

Olofsson, Kim LU ; Wiman, Magnus LU and Lidén, Gunnar LU (2008) In Biotechnology for Biofuels 1(1).
Abstract
ABSTRACT: Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) is one process option for production of ethanol from lignocellulose. The principal benefits of performing the enzymatic hydrolysis together with the fermentation, instead of in a separate step after the hydrolysis, are the reduced end-product inhibition of the enzymatic hydrolysis, and the reduced investment costs. The principal drawbacks, on the other hand, are the need to find favorable conditions (e.g. temperature and pH) for both the enzymatic hydrolysis and the fermentation and the difficulty to recycle the fermenting organism and the enzymes. To satisfy the first requirement, the temperature is normally kept below 37 degrees C, whereas the difficulty to recycle the yeast... (More)
ABSTRACT: Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) is one process option for production of ethanol from lignocellulose. The principal benefits of performing the enzymatic hydrolysis together with the fermentation, instead of in a separate step after the hydrolysis, are the reduced end-product inhibition of the enzymatic hydrolysis, and the reduced investment costs. The principal drawbacks, on the other hand, are the need to find favorable conditions (e.g. temperature and pH) for both the enzymatic hydrolysis and the fermentation and the difficulty to recycle the fermenting organism and the enzymes. To satisfy the first requirement, the temperature is normally kept below 37 degrees C, whereas the difficulty to recycle the yeast makes it beneficial to operate with a low yeast concentration and at a high solid loading. In this review, we make a brief overview of recent experimental work and development of SSF using lignocellulosic feedstocks. Significant progress has been made with respect to increasing the substrate loading, decreasing the yeast concentration and co-fermentation of both hexoses and pentoses during SSF. Presently, an SSF process for e.g. wheat straw hydrolyzate can be expected to give final ethanol concentrations close to 40 g L-1 with a yield based on total hexoses and pentoses higher than 70%. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Biotechnology for Biofuels
volume
1
issue
1
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • wos:000272004900002
  • pmid:18471273
  • scopus:45149107626
ISSN
1754-6834
DOI
10.1186/1754-6834-1-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
27a5fb0b-1417-4cf7-a0d1-ee78072a0585 (old id 1154316)
date added to LUP
2008-10-10 12:29:47
date last changed
2017-09-24 03:54:28
@article{27a5fb0b-1417-4cf7-a0d1-ee78072a0585,
  abstract     = {ABSTRACT: Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) is one process option for production of ethanol from lignocellulose. The principal benefits of performing the enzymatic hydrolysis together with the fermentation, instead of in a separate step after the hydrolysis, are the reduced end-product inhibition of the enzymatic hydrolysis, and the reduced investment costs. The principal drawbacks, on the other hand, are the need to find favorable conditions (e.g. temperature and pH) for both the enzymatic hydrolysis and the fermentation and the difficulty to recycle the fermenting organism and the enzymes. To satisfy the first requirement, the temperature is normally kept below 37 degrees C, whereas the difficulty to recycle the yeast makes it beneficial to operate with a low yeast concentration and at a high solid loading. In this review, we make a brief overview of recent experimental work and development of SSF using lignocellulosic feedstocks. Significant progress has been made with respect to increasing the substrate loading, decreasing the yeast concentration and co-fermentation of both hexoses and pentoses during SSF. Presently, an SSF process for e.g. wheat straw hydrolyzate can be expected to give final ethanol concentrations close to 40 g L-1 with a yield based on total hexoses and pentoses higher than 70%.},
  articleno    = {7},
  author       = {Olofsson, Kim and Wiman, Magnus and Lidén, Gunnar},
  issn         = {1754-6834},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Biotechnology for Biofuels},
  title        = {A short review on SSF - an interesting process option for ethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstocks.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1754-6834-1-7},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2008},
}