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Infiltration of Mast Cells in Rat Colon Is a Consequence of Ischemia/Reperfusion.

Sand, Elin; Themner-Persson, Anna LU and Ekblad, Eva LU (2008) In Digestive Diseases and Sciences 53. p.3158-3169
Abstract
Intestinal ischemia as well as mastocytosis occur in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Our aim was to clarify how ischemia with reperfusion (I/R) affects the structure, enteric neurons, and immune cells in the colon. Rats were subjected to colon ischemia for 1 h and reperfused for 1 day up to 20 weeks; sham-operated rats were used as controls. No structural remodeling of the intestinal segment was detected after I/R. The number and distribution of eosinophils were not affected by I/R. Local areas containing numerous mast cells were detected in the muscle layers, the serosa, and in and around the myenteric ganglia 4-20 weeks post ischemia. It was notable that myenteric ganglionic formations within... (More)
Intestinal ischemia as well as mastocytosis occur in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Our aim was to clarify how ischemia with reperfusion (I/R) affects the structure, enteric neurons, and immune cells in the colon. Rats were subjected to colon ischemia for 1 h and reperfused for 1 day up to 20 weeks; sham-operated rats were used as controls. No structural remodeling of the intestinal segment was detected after I/R. The number and distribution of eosinophils were not affected by I/R. Local areas containing numerous mast cells were detected in the muscle layers, the serosa, and in and around the myenteric ganglia 4-20 weeks post ischemia. It was notable that myenteric ganglionic formations within mast-cell-rich areas virtually lacked neurons. Mast cells were rarely found in controls. In conclusion, I/R of the colon attracts mast cells, and death of myenteric neurons occurs in such locations. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Digestive Diseases and Sciences
volume
53
pages
3158 - 3169
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000260837000016
  • pmid:18463982
  • scopus:55949100162
ISSN
1573-2568
DOI
10.1007/s10620-008-0279-x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
48a470f0-3dd6-47ce-a9c3-ccee79120171 (old id 1154433)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18463982?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-06-03 11:21:48
date last changed
2017-05-21 04:34:54
@article{48a470f0-3dd6-47ce-a9c3-ccee79120171,
  abstract     = {Intestinal ischemia as well as mastocytosis occur in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Our aim was to clarify how ischemia with reperfusion (I/R) affects the structure, enteric neurons, and immune cells in the colon. Rats were subjected to colon ischemia for 1 h and reperfused for 1 day up to 20 weeks; sham-operated rats were used as controls. No structural remodeling of the intestinal segment was detected after I/R. The number and distribution of eosinophils were not affected by I/R. Local areas containing numerous mast cells were detected in the muscle layers, the serosa, and in and around the myenteric ganglia 4-20 weeks post ischemia. It was notable that myenteric ganglionic formations within mast-cell-rich areas virtually lacked neurons. Mast cells were rarely found in controls. In conclusion, I/R of the colon attracts mast cells, and death of myenteric neurons occurs in such locations.},
  author       = {Sand, Elin and Themner-Persson, Anna and Ekblad, Eva},
  issn         = {1573-2568},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {3158--3169},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Digestive Diseases and Sciences},
  title        = {Infiltration of Mast Cells in Rat Colon Is a Consequence of Ischemia/Reperfusion.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10620-008-0279-x},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2008},
}