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Spontaneous muscle twitches during sleep guide spinal self-organization.

Petersson, Per LU ; Waldenström Ellervik, Alexandra LU ; Fåhraeus, Christer and Schouenborg, Jens LU (2003) In Nature 424(6944). p.72-75
Abstract
During development, information about the three-dimensional shape and mechanical properties of the body is laid down in the synaptic connectivity of sensorimotor systems through unknown adaptive mechanisms. In spinal reflex systems, this enables the fast transformation of complex sensory information into adequate correction of movements. Here we use a computer simulation to show that an unsupervised correlation-based learning mechanism, using spontaneous muscle twitches, can account for the functional adaptation of the withdrawal reflex system. We also show that tactile feedback resulting from spontaneous muscle twitches during sleep(1-3) does indeed modify sensorimotor transformation in young rats in a predictable manner. The results... (More)
During development, information about the three-dimensional shape and mechanical properties of the body is laid down in the synaptic connectivity of sensorimotor systems through unknown adaptive mechanisms. In spinal reflex systems, this enables the fast transformation of complex sensory information into adequate correction of movements. Here we use a computer simulation to show that an unsupervised correlation-based learning mechanism, using spontaneous muscle twitches, can account for the functional adaptation of the withdrawal reflex system. We also show that tactile feedback resulting from spontaneous muscle twitches during sleep(1-3) does indeed modify sensorimotor transformation in young rats in a predictable manner. The results indicate that these twitches, corresponding to human fetal movements(4), are important in spinal self-organization. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nature
volume
424
issue
6944
pages
72 - 75
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000183912800042
  • pmid:12840761
  • scopus:0037926495
ISSN
0028-0836
DOI
10.1038/nature01719
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2550aa4c-2265-4cd0-9d15-1b0ba7c0fd26 (old id 116522)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12840761&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-18 16:16:08
date last changed
2018-10-03 10:07:50
@article{2550aa4c-2265-4cd0-9d15-1b0ba7c0fd26,
  abstract     = {During development, information about the three-dimensional shape and mechanical properties of the body is laid down in the synaptic connectivity of sensorimotor systems through unknown adaptive mechanisms. In spinal reflex systems, this enables the fast transformation of complex sensory information into adequate correction of movements. Here we use a computer simulation to show that an unsupervised correlation-based learning mechanism, using spontaneous muscle twitches, can account for the functional adaptation of the withdrawal reflex system. We also show that tactile feedback resulting from spontaneous muscle twitches during sleep(1-3) does indeed modify sensorimotor transformation in young rats in a predictable manner. The results indicate that these twitches, corresponding to human fetal movements(4), are important in spinal self-organization.},
  author       = {Petersson, Per and Waldenström Ellervik, Alexandra and Fåhraeus, Christer and Schouenborg, Jens},
  issn         = {0028-0836},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6944},
  pages        = {72--75},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Nature},
  title        = {Spontaneous muscle twitches during sleep guide spinal self-organization.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature01719},
  volume       = {424},
  year         = {2003},
}