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Sex differences in risk factor control of treated hypertensives: a national primary healthcare-based study in Sweden.

Journath, Gunilla; Hellénius, Mai-Lis; Petersson, Ulla LU ; Theobald, Holger and Nilsson, Peter LU (2008) In European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation 15(3). p.258-262
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To evaluate potential sex differences, this study aimed to investigate blood pressure and lipid control and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease in treated hypertensive (tHT) patients from primary healthcare. DESIGN AND METHODS: This cross-sectional survey of tHT patients was carried out between 2002 and 2005 by 264 primary care physicians from Sweden who consecutively recruited 6537 tHT patients (48% men and 52% women) from medical records. RESULTS: tHT men more often reached the treatment goal for systolic/diastolic blood pressure, less than 140/90 mmHg, than tHT women (30 vs. 26%, P<0.01). Men had lower systolic blood pressure than women, however, women had lower diastolic blood pressure and higher pulse... (More)
BACKGROUND: To evaluate potential sex differences, this study aimed to investigate blood pressure and lipid control and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease in treated hypertensive (tHT) patients from primary healthcare. DESIGN AND METHODS: This cross-sectional survey of tHT patients was carried out between 2002 and 2005 by 264 primary care physicians from Sweden who consecutively recruited 6537 tHT patients (48% men and 52% women) from medical records. RESULTS: tHT men more often reached the treatment goal for systolic/diastolic blood pressure, less than 140/90 mmHg, than tHT women (30 vs. 26%, P<0.01). Men had lower systolic blood pressure than women, however, women had lower diastolic blood pressure and higher pulse pressure. More tHT women had total cholesterol >/=5.0 mmol/l than corresponding men (75 vs. 64% P<0.001). Men more often had diabetes (25 vs. 20% P<0.001), left ventricular hypertrophy (20 vs. 16% P<0.001), and microalbuminuria (24 vs. 16% P<0.001). Women were more often treated with diuretics (64 vs. 48%) and beta-receptor blockers (54 vs. 51%), and men more often treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (27 vs. 18%), calcium channel blockers (34 vs. 26%), and lipid-lowering drugs (34 vs. 29%). CONCLUSION: A need still exists for more intensified treatment of elevated blood pressure and hypercholesterolemia, especially in women. In hypertensives of both sexes, smoking and other risk factors also need to be addressed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation
volume
15
issue
3
pages
258 - 262
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000257185200003
  • pmid:18525379
  • scopus:56149112987
ISSN
1741-8275
DOI
10.1097/HJR.0b013e3282f37a45
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
79d6519c-e3a8-4aa0-a340-573ca3dfc304 (old id 1169169)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18525379?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-07-03 10:54:13
date last changed
2017-09-17 08:16:37
@article{79d6519c-e3a8-4aa0-a340-573ca3dfc304,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: To evaluate potential sex differences, this study aimed to investigate blood pressure and lipid control and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease in treated hypertensive (tHT) patients from primary healthcare. DESIGN AND METHODS: This cross-sectional survey of tHT patients was carried out between 2002 and 2005 by 264 primary care physicians from Sweden who consecutively recruited 6537 tHT patients (48% men and 52% women) from medical records. RESULTS: tHT men more often reached the treatment goal for systolic/diastolic blood pressure, less than 140/90 mmHg, than tHT women (30 vs. 26%, P&lt;0.01). Men had lower systolic blood pressure than women, however, women had lower diastolic blood pressure and higher pulse pressure. More tHT women had total cholesterol &gt;/=5.0 mmol/l than corresponding men (75 vs. 64% P&lt;0.001). Men more often had diabetes (25 vs. 20% P&lt;0.001), left ventricular hypertrophy (20 vs. 16% P&lt;0.001), and microalbuminuria (24 vs. 16% P&lt;0.001). Women were more often treated with diuretics (64 vs. 48%) and beta-receptor blockers (54 vs. 51%), and men more often treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (27 vs. 18%), calcium channel blockers (34 vs. 26%), and lipid-lowering drugs (34 vs. 29%). CONCLUSION: A need still exists for more intensified treatment of elevated blood pressure and hypercholesterolemia, especially in women. In hypertensives of both sexes, smoking and other risk factors also need to be addressed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.},
  author       = {Journath, Gunilla and Hellénius, Mai-Lis and Petersson, Ulla and Theobald, Holger and Nilsson, Peter},
  issn         = {1741-8275},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {258--262},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Sex differences in risk factor control of treated hypertensives: a national primary healthcare-based study in Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJR.0b013e3282f37a45},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2008},
}