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Infantile colic, maternal smoking and infant feeding at 5 weeks of age.

Canivet, Catarina LU ; Östergren, Per-Olof LU ; Jakobsson, Irene LU ; Dejin-Karlsson, Elisabeth and Hagander, Barbro LU (2008) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 36(3). p.284-291
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Many parents seek help from health professionals because of their infants' persistent crying in the early months. The aetiology of this condition, often labelled ;;infantile colic'', is still unclear. AIMS: To assess whether smoking during pregnancy, and/or smoking at infant age 5 weeks, is associated with infantile colic, and to describe how feeding at infant age 5 weeks and smoking are related to colic. METHODS: This was a community-based study, with telephone interviews in late pregnancy, and at infant age 5 weeks, covering 1,625 mother-infant dyads, i.e. 86% of the eligible population. RESULTS: Daily maternal smoking in pregnancy was related to subsequent colic, with an age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.74 (95% confidence... (More)
BACKGROUND: Many parents seek help from health professionals because of their infants' persistent crying in the early months. The aetiology of this condition, often labelled ;;infantile colic'', is still unclear. AIMS: To assess whether smoking during pregnancy, and/or smoking at infant age 5 weeks, is associated with infantile colic, and to describe how feeding at infant age 5 weeks and smoking are related to colic. METHODS: This was a community-based study, with telephone interviews in late pregnancy, and at infant age 5 weeks, covering 1,625 mother-infant dyads, i.e. 86% of the eligible population. RESULTS: Daily maternal smoking in pregnancy was related to subsequent colic, with an age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.74 (95% confidence interval 1.08-2.82). In the multivariate model, the OR was largely unaltered. The association between smoking at infant age 5 weeks and colic did not reach statistical significance. The subgroups based on smoking and infant feeding were small, but the results suggest that exclusive breast-feeding was protective against colic, including for infants of smoking mothers. CONCLUSIONS: This study presents yet another argument why smoking in pregnancy should be discouraged - some cases of infantile colic may be avoided. With regard to mothers who are not able to give up smoking, the results add some support for the conclusion that if a mother is worried about colic, she certainly should not refrain from breast-feeding even if she smokes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Colic: prevention & control, Breast Feeding: adverse effects, Colic: etiology, Smoking: adverse effects
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
volume
36
issue
3
pages
284 - 291
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000256236600010
  • pmid:18519298
  • scopus:42649089093
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1177/1403494807086981
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
abdc14d4-6a7d-43b2-b123-1c8c7594df7c (old id 1169309)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18519298?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-07-03 09:40:34
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:48:39
@article{abdc14d4-6a7d-43b2-b123-1c8c7594df7c,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Many parents seek help from health professionals because of their infants' persistent crying in the early months. The aetiology of this condition, often labelled ;;infantile colic'', is still unclear. AIMS: To assess whether smoking during pregnancy, and/or smoking at infant age 5 weeks, is associated with infantile colic, and to describe how feeding at infant age 5 weeks and smoking are related to colic. METHODS: This was a community-based study, with telephone interviews in late pregnancy, and at infant age 5 weeks, covering 1,625 mother-infant dyads, i.e. 86% of the eligible population. RESULTS: Daily maternal smoking in pregnancy was related to subsequent colic, with an age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.74 (95% confidence interval 1.08-2.82). In the multivariate model, the OR was largely unaltered. The association between smoking at infant age 5 weeks and colic did not reach statistical significance. The subgroups based on smoking and infant feeding were small, but the results suggest that exclusive breast-feeding was protective against colic, including for infants of smoking mothers. CONCLUSIONS: This study presents yet another argument why smoking in pregnancy should be discouraged - some cases of infantile colic may be avoided. With regard to mothers who are not able to give up smoking, the results add some support for the conclusion that if a mother is worried about colic, she certainly should not refrain from breast-feeding even if she smokes.},
  author       = {Canivet, Catarina and Östergren, Per-Olof and Jakobsson, Irene and Dejin-Karlsson, Elisabeth and Hagander, Barbro},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  keyword      = {Colic: prevention & control,Breast Feeding: adverse effects,Colic: etiology,Smoking: adverse effects},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {284--291},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Infantile colic, maternal smoking and infant feeding at 5 weeks of age.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1403494807086981},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2008},
}