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Risk of myocardial infarction in relation to plasma levels of homocysteine and inflammation-sensitive proteins: a long-term nested case-control study.

Lind, Peter; Hedblad, Bo LU ; Hultberg, Björn LU ; Stavenow, Lars; Janzon, Lars LU and Lindgärde, Folke LU (2003) In Angiology 54(4). p.401-410
Abstract
Several studies have found that the homocysteine plasma level is associated with cardiovascular disease. The authors previously described a relationship between concentrations of fibrinogen and other inflammation-sensitive plasma proteins, namely, alpha1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, and orosomucoid (alpha1-acid glucoprotein) and the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Whether levels of these proteins are related to homocysteine has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a supposed relationship between homocysteine in plasma and the occurrence of MI is modified by these inflammation-sensitive proteins. A nested case-control study was designed, comprising 241 cases of MI, with a mean age of 48... (More)
Several studies have found that the homocysteine plasma level is associated with cardiovascular disease. The authors previously described a relationship between concentrations of fibrinogen and other inflammation-sensitive plasma proteins, namely, alpha1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, and orosomucoid (alpha1-acid glucoprotein) and the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Whether levels of these proteins are related to homocysteine has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a supposed relationship between homocysteine in plasma and the occurrence of MI is modified by these inflammation-sensitive proteins. A nested case-control study was designed, comprising 241 cases of MI, with a mean age of 48 years at baseline, and 241 controls matched for age, month of examination, and duration of follow-up. The mean homocysteine concentration did not differ between cases and controls and there was no association between the baseline homocysteine level and the time lapse before the occurrence of the MI. For the cases, there was no correlation between homocysteine and any of the measured proteins, but for the controls, homocysteine was weakly but significantly negatively correlated to haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin and slightly positively correlated to albumin. For the separated groups of cases and controls there was no association between the number of inflammation-sensitive proteins in the top quartiles and homocysteine concentration. In this population-based, prospective cohort study the occurrence of MI had no relationship to homocysteine baseline plasma level. Furthermore, there was no strong association between homocysteine and the concentrations of any of these inflammation-sensitive proteins. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Angiology
volume
54
issue
4
pages
401 - 410
publisher
SAGE Publications
external identifiers
  • wos:000184518800003
  • scopus:0041665157
ISSN
0003-3197
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fd95c8ae-530a-45ba-8ef7-a2c6a5553847 (old id 117133)
date added to LUP
2007-07-05 12:28:16
date last changed
2017-01-22 04:12:21
@article{fd95c8ae-530a-45ba-8ef7-a2c6a5553847,
  abstract     = {Several studies have found that the homocysteine plasma level is associated with cardiovascular disease. The authors previously described a relationship between concentrations of fibrinogen and other inflammation-sensitive plasma proteins, namely, alpha1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, and orosomucoid (alpha1-acid glucoprotein) and the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Whether levels of these proteins are related to homocysteine has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a supposed relationship between homocysteine in plasma and the occurrence of MI is modified by these inflammation-sensitive proteins. A nested case-control study was designed, comprising 241 cases of MI, with a mean age of 48 years at baseline, and 241 controls matched for age, month of examination, and duration of follow-up. The mean homocysteine concentration did not differ between cases and controls and there was no association between the baseline homocysteine level and the time lapse before the occurrence of the MI. For the cases, there was no correlation between homocysteine and any of the measured proteins, but for the controls, homocysteine was weakly but significantly negatively correlated to haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin and slightly positively correlated to albumin. For the separated groups of cases and controls there was no association between the number of inflammation-sensitive proteins in the top quartiles and homocysteine concentration. In this population-based, prospective cohort study the occurrence of MI had no relationship to homocysteine baseline plasma level. Furthermore, there was no strong association between homocysteine and the concentrations of any of these inflammation-sensitive proteins.},
  author       = {Lind, Peter and Hedblad, Bo and Hultberg, Björn and Stavenow, Lars and Janzon, Lars and Lindgärde, Folke},
  issn         = {0003-3197},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {401--410},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications},
  series       = {Angiology},
  title        = {Risk of myocardial infarction in relation to plasma levels of homocysteine and inflammation-sensitive proteins: a long-term nested case-control study.},
  volume       = {54},
  year         = {2003},
}