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A hidden curriculum: mapping cultural competency in a medical programme.

Wachtler, Caroline LU and Troein, Margareta LU (2003) In Medical Education 37(10). p.861-868
Abstract
Background Cultural competency can be understood as those learned skills which help us understand cultural differences and ease communication between people who have different ways of understanding health, sickness and the body. Recently, medical schools have begun to recognise a need for cultural competency training. However, few reports have been published that articulate and evaluate cultural competency in medical curricula.



Aim This study was performed in order to evaluate the current status of cultural competency training at a medical school in southern Sweden.



Methods We used a multimethod approach to curriculum evaluation. We reviewed the published list of learning objectives for the medical... (More)
Background Cultural competency can be understood as those learned skills which help us understand cultural differences and ease communication between people who have different ways of understanding health, sickness and the body. Recently, medical schools have begun to recognise a need for cultural competency training. However, few reports have been published that articulate and evaluate cultural competency in medical curricula.



Aim This study was performed in order to evaluate the current status of cultural competency training at a medical school in southern Sweden.



Methods We used a multimethod approach to curriculum evaluation. We reviewed the published list of learning objectives for the medical programme, interviewed curriculum directors and individual teachers for each term about course content and carried out focus group interviews with students in all stages of the medical programme.



Results Cultural competency is a present but mostly hidden part of the curriculum. We found learning objectives about cultural competency. Teachers reported a total of 25 instances of teaching that had culture or cultural competency as the main theme or 1 of many themes. Students reported few specific learning instances where cultural competency was the main theme. Students and teachers considered cultural competency training to be integrated into the medical programme. Cultural competency was not assessed.



Conclusion This evaluation showed places in the curriculum where cultural competency is a present, absent or hidden part of the curriculum. The differences between the 3 perspectives on the curriculum lead us to propose curriculum changes. This study illustrates how triangulation with a multifactorial methodology leads to understanding of the current curriculum and changes for the future. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Medical Education
volume
37
issue
10
pages
861 - 868
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:12974839
  • wos:000185349600006
  • scopus:0141748456
ISSN
0308-0110
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2923.2003.01624.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
39a7fd6e-4677-47e7-8ac4-36f4990bd46c (old id 117763)
date added to LUP
2007-07-30 13:25:56
date last changed
2018-08-19 03:35:40
@article{39a7fd6e-4677-47e7-8ac4-36f4990bd46c,
  abstract     = {Background Cultural competency can be understood as those learned skills which help us understand cultural differences and ease communication between people who have different ways of understanding health, sickness and the body. Recently, medical schools have begun to recognise a need for cultural competency training. However, few reports have been published that articulate and evaluate cultural competency in medical curricula.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Aim This study was performed in order to evaluate the current status of cultural competency training at a medical school in southern Sweden.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods We used a multimethod approach to curriculum evaluation. We reviewed the published list of learning objectives for the medical programme, interviewed curriculum directors and individual teachers for each term about course content and carried out focus group interviews with students in all stages of the medical programme.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results Cultural competency is a present but mostly hidden part of the curriculum. We found learning objectives about cultural competency. Teachers reported a total of 25 instances of teaching that had culture or cultural competency as the main theme or 1 of many themes. Students reported few specific learning instances where cultural competency was the main theme. Students and teachers considered cultural competency training to be integrated into the medical programme. Cultural competency was not assessed.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion This evaluation showed places in the curriculum where cultural competency is a present, absent or hidden part of the curriculum. The differences between the 3 perspectives on the curriculum lead us to propose curriculum changes. This study illustrates how triangulation with a multifactorial methodology leads to understanding of the current curriculum and changes for the future.},
  author       = {Wachtler, Caroline and Troein, Margareta},
  issn         = {0308-0110},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {861--868},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Medical Education},
  title        = {A hidden curriculum: mapping cultural competency in a medical programme.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2923.2003.01624.x},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2003},
}