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Human mast cells decrease SLPI levels in type II - like alveolar cell model, in vitro.

Hollander, Camilla LU ; Nyström, Max LU ; Janciauskiene, Sabina LU and Westin, Ulla LU (2003) In Cancer Cell International 3(1).
Abstract
Background



Mast cells are known to accumulate at sites of inflammation and upon activation to release their granule content, e.g. histamine, cytokines and proteases. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is produced in the respiratory mucous and plays a role in regulating the activity of the proteases.



Result



We have used the HMC-1 cell line as a model for human mast cells to investigate their effect on SLPI expression and its levels in cell co-culture experiments, in vitro. In comparison with controls, we found a significant reduction in SLPI levels (by 2.35-fold, p < 0.01) in a SLPI-producing, type II-like alveolar cell line, (A549) when co-cultured with HMC-1 cells,... (More)
Background



Mast cells are known to accumulate at sites of inflammation and upon activation to release their granule content, e.g. histamine, cytokines and proteases. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is produced in the respiratory mucous and plays a role in regulating the activity of the proteases.



Result



We have used the HMC-1 cell line as a model for human mast cells to investigate their effect on SLPI expression and its levels in cell co-culture experiments, in vitro. In comparison with controls, we found a significant reduction in SLPI levels (by 2.35-fold, p < 0.01) in a SLPI-producing, type II-like alveolar cell line, (A549) when co-cultured with HMC-1 cells, but not in an HMC-1-conditioned medium, for 96 hours. By contrast, increased SLPI mRNA expression (by 1.58-fold, p < 0.05) was found under the same experimental conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed mast cell transmigration in co-culture with SLPI-producing A549 cells for 72 and 96 hours.



Conclusion



These results indicate that SLPI-producing cells may assist mast cell migration and that the regulation of SLPI release and/or consumption by mast cells requires interaction between these cell types. Therefore, a "local relationship" between mast cells and airway epithelial cells might be an important step in the inflammatory response. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cancer Cell International
volume
3
issue
1
pages
9 pages
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:2442706166
ISSN
1475-2867
DOI
10.1186/1475-2867-3-14
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d5d53925-2192-4f91-806b-192645d927a3 (old id 117993)
alternative location
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pubmed&pubmedid=12952550
date added to LUP
2007-07-23 16:15:57
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:44:55
@article{d5d53925-2192-4f91-806b-192645d927a3,
  abstract     = {Background<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Mast cells are known to accumulate at sites of inflammation and upon activation to release their granule content, e.g. histamine, cytokines and proteases. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is produced in the respiratory mucous and plays a role in regulating the activity of the proteases.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Result<br/><br>
<br/><br>
We have used the HMC-1 cell line as a model for human mast cells to investigate their effect on SLPI expression and its levels in cell co-culture experiments, in vitro. In comparison with controls, we found a significant reduction in SLPI levels (by 2.35-fold, p &lt; 0.01) in a SLPI-producing, type II-like alveolar cell line, (A549) when co-cultured with HMC-1 cells, but not in an HMC-1-conditioned medium, for 96 hours. By contrast, increased SLPI mRNA expression (by 1.58-fold, p &lt; 0.05) was found under the same experimental conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed mast cell transmigration in co-culture with SLPI-producing A549 cells for 72 and 96 hours.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion<br/><br>
<br/><br>
These results indicate that SLPI-producing cells may assist mast cell migration and that the regulation of SLPI release and/or consumption by mast cells requires interaction between these cell types. Therefore, a "local relationship" between mast cells and airway epithelial cells might be an important step in the inflammatory response.},
  articleno    = {14},
  author       = {Hollander, Camilla and Nyström, Max and Janciauskiene, Sabina and Westin, Ulla},
  issn         = {1475-2867},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {9},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Cancer Cell International},
  title        = {Human mast cells decrease SLPI levels in type II - like alveolar cell model, in vitro.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2867-3-14},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2003},
}