Advanced

Muscle strength training, gait performance and physiotherapy after stroke.

Lexell, Jan LU and Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt LU (2008) In Minerva Medica 99(4). p.353-368
Abstract
Hemiparesis after stroke, with muscle weakness and reduced gait performance, is a leading cause of long-term disability. To improve lower limb muscle strength and mobility post stroke, there is a need for effective training METHODS: This review summarises the effects of lower limb progressive resistance training ([PRT]; loads of 70% or more of the maximum strength) on muscle strength, muscle tone, gait performance and perceived participation after stroke. PRT is a safe and effective way to improve muscle strength post stroke, without negative effects on muscle tone. Furthermore, improvements in muscle strength positively influence gait performance and perceived participation. Current recommendations for stroke rehabilitation include... (More)
Hemiparesis after stroke, with muscle weakness and reduced gait performance, is a leading cause of long-term disability. To improve lower limb muscle strength and mobility post stroke, there is a need for effective training METHODS: This review summarises the effects of lower limb progressive resistance training ([PRT]; loads of 70% or more of the maximum strength) on muscle strength, muscle tone, gait performance and perceived participation after stroke. PRT is a safe and effective way to improve muscle strength post stroke, without negative effects on muscle tone. Furthermore, improvements in muscle strength positively influence gait performance and perceived participation. Current recommendations for stroke rehabilitation include strength training, which can also be an effective form of fitness training for subjects with minor weakness. Despite its proven effectiveness, further studies are needed to find the most appropriate time to start PRT post-stroke, to identify those stroke individuals that can benefit most from PRT and how to combined PRT with other physiotherapeutic stroke interventions. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Minerva Medica
volume
99
issue
4
pages
353 - 368
publisher
Edizioni Minerva Medica
external identifiers
  • pmid:18663344
  • scopus:52449092245
ISSN
0026-4806
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e1fe147e-6ffb-4a84-acd3-4b2440fd5d0f (old id 1180797)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18663344?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-08-07 11:47:43
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:55:43
@article{e1fe147e-6ffb-4a84-acd3-4b2440fd5d0f,
  abstract     = {Hemiparesis after stroke, with muscle weakness and reduced gait performance, is a leading cause of long-term disability. To improve lower limb muscle strength and mobility post stroke, there is a need for effective training METHODS: This review summarises the effects of lower limb progressive resistance training ([PRT]; loads of 70% or more of the maximum strength) on muscle strength, muscle tone, gait performance and perceived participation after stroke. PRT is a safe and effective way to improve muscle strength post stroke, without negative effects on muscle tone. Furthermore, improvements in muscle strength positively influence gait performance and perceived participation. Current recommendations for stroke rehabilitation include strength training, which can also be an effective form of fitness training for subjects with minor weakness. Despite its proven effectiveness, further studies are needed to find the most appropriate time to start PRT post-stroke, to identify those stroke individuals that can benefit most from PRT and how to combined PRT with other physiotherapeutic stroke interventions.},
  author       = {Lexell, Jan and Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt},
  issn         = {0026-4806},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {353--368},
  publisher    = {Edizioni Minerva Medica},
  series       = {Minerva Medica},
  title        = {Muscle strength training, gait performance and physiotherapy after stroke.},
  volume       = {99},
  year         = {2008},
}