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Lactic acid fermentation in a recycle batch reactor using immobilized Lactobacillus casei.

Senthuran, A; Senthuran, V; Mattiasson, Bo LU and Hatti-Kaul, Rajni LU (1997) In Biotechnology and Bioengineering 55(6). p.841-853
Abstract
Lactic acid production by recycle batch fermentation using immobilized cells of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus was studied. The culture medium was composed of whey treated with an endoprotease, and supplemented with 2.5 g/L of yeast extract and 0.18 mM Mn(2+) ions. The fermentation set-up comprised of a column packed with polyethyleneimine-coated foam glass particles, Pora-bact A, and connected with recirculation to a stirred tank reactor vessel for pH control. The immobilization of L. casei was performed simply by circulating the culture medium inoculated with the organism over the beads. At this stage, a long lag period preceded the cell growth and lactic acid production. Subsequently, for recycle batch fermentations using the... (More)
Lactic acid production by recycle batch fermentation using immobilized cells of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus was studied. The culture medium was composed of whey treated with an endoprotease, and supplemented with 2.5 g/L of yeast extract and 0.18 mM Mn(2+) ions. The fermentation set-up comprised of a column packed with polyethyleneimine-coated foam glass particles, Pora-bact A, and connected with recirculation to a stirred tank reactor vessel for pH control. The immobilization of L. casei was performed simply by circulating the culture medium inoculated with the organism over the beads. At this stage, a long lag period preceded the cell growth and lactic acid production. Subsequently, for recycle batch fermentations using the immobilized cells, the reducing sugar concentration of the medium was increased to 100 g/L by addition of glucose. The lactic acid production started immediately after onset of fermentation and the average reactor productivity during repeated cycles was about 4.3 to 4.6 g/L . h, with complete substrate utilization and more than 90% product yield. Sugar consumption and lactate yield were maintained at the same level with increase in medium volume up to at least 10 times that of the immobilized biocatalyst. The liberation of significant amounts of cells into the medium limited the number of fermentation cycles possible in a recycle batch mode. Use of lower yeast extract concentration reduced the amount of suspended biomass without significant change in productivity, thereby also increasing the number of fermentation cycles, and even maintained the D-lactate amount at low levels. The product was recovered from the clarified and decolorized broth by ion-exchange adsorption. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 55:841-853, 1997. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
immobilized cells, lactic acid bacteria, adhesive fermentation, poly(ethyleneimine), recycle batch reactor
in
Biotechnology and Bioengineering
volume
55
issue
6
pages
841 - 853
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:18636595
  • scopus:0342378145
ISSN
1097-0290
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1097-0290(19970920)55:6<841::AID-BIT3>3.0.CO;2-G
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f2179304-0395-469f-b26d-215da8b48952 (old id 1181039)
date added to LUP
2008-10-10 12:57:14
date last changed
2017-04-23 03:39:36
@article{f2179304-0395-469f-b26d-215da8b48952,
  abstract     = {Lactic acid production by recycle batch fermentation using immobilized cells of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus was studied. The culture medium was composed of whey treated with an endoprotease, and supplemented with 2.5 g/L of yeast extract and 0.18 mM Mn(2+) ions. The fermentation set-up comprised of a column packed with polyethyleneimine-coated foam glass particles, Pora-bact A, and connected with recirculation to a stirred tank reactor vessel for pH control. The immobilization of L. casei was performed simply by circulating the culture medium inoculated with the organism over the beads. At this stage, a long lag period preceded the cell growth and lactic acid production. Subsequently, for recycle batch fermentations using the immobilized cells, the reducing sugar concentration of the medium was increased to 100 g/L by addition of glucose. The lactic acid production started immediately after onset of fermentation and the average reactor productivity during repeated cycles was about 4.3 to 4.6 g/L . h, with complete substrate utilization and more than 90% product yield. Sugar consumption and lactate yield were maintained at the same level with increase in medium volume up to at least 10 times that of the immobilized biocatalyst. The liberation of significant amounts of cells into the medium limited the number of fermentation cycles possible in a recycle batch mode. Use of lower yeast extract concentration reduced the amount of suspended biomass without significant change in productivity, thereby also increasing the number of fermentation cycles, and even maintained the D-lactate amount at low levels. The product was recovered from the clarified and decolorized broth by ion-exchange adsorption. (c) 1997 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 55:841-853, 1997.},
  author       = {Senthuran, A and Senthuran, V and Mattiasson, Bo and Hatti-Kaul, Rajni},
  issn         = {1097-0290},
  keyword      = {immobilized cells,lactic acid bacteria,adhesive fermentation,poly(ethyleneimine),recycle batch reactor},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {841--853},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Biotechnology and Bioengineering},
  title        = {Lactic acid fermentation in a recycle batch reactor using immobilized Lactobacillus casei.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1097-0290(19970920)55:6<841::AID-BIT3>3.0.CO;2-G},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {1997},
}