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Cardiovascular and respiratory responses to apneas with and without face immersion in exercising humans.

Andersson, Johan LU ; Linér, Mats LU ; Fredsted, Anne and Schagatay, Erika K (2004) In Journal of Applied Physiology 96(3). p.1005-1010
Abstract
The effect of the diving response on alveolar gas exchange was investigated in 15 subjects. During steady-state exercise (80 W) on a cycle ergometer, the subjects performed 40-s apneas in air and 40-s apneas with face immersion in cold (10°C) water. Heart rate decreased and blood pressure increased during apneas, and the responses were augmented by face immersion. Oxygen uptake from the lungs decreased during apnea in air (-22% compared with eupneic control) and was further reduced during apnea with face immersion (-25% compared with eupneic control). The plasma lactate concentration increased from control (11%) after apnea in air and even more after apnea with face immersion (20%), suggesting an increased anaerobic metabolism during... (More)
The effect of the diving response on alveolar gas exchange was investigated in 15 subjects. During steady-state exercise (80 W) on a cycle ergometer, the subjects performed 40-s apneas in air and 40-s apneas with face immersion in cold (10°C) water. Heart rate decreased and blood pressure increased during apneas, and the responses were augmented by face immersion. Oxygen uptake from the lungs decreased during apnea in air (-22% compared with eupneic control) and was further reduced during apnea with face immersion (-25% compared with eupneic control). The plasma lactate concentration increased from control (11%) after apnea in air and even more after apnea with face immersion (20%), suggesting an increased anaerobic metabolism during apneas. The lung oxygen store was depleted more slowly during apnea with face immersion because of the augmented diving response, probably including a decrease in cardiac output. Venous oxygen stores were probably reduced by the cardiovascular responses. The turnover times of these gas stores would have been prolonged, reducing their effect on the oxygen uptake in the lungs. Thus the human diving response has an oxygen-conserving effect. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Applied Physiology
volume
96
issue
3
pages
1005 - 1010
publisher
American Physiological Society
external identifiers
  • pmid:14578373
  • wos:000188763400026
  • scopus:1342325481
ISSN
1522-1601
DOI
10.1152/japplphysiol.01057.2002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
92113870-a595-4256-8d55-7ed5e514fd1e (old id 118209)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=14578373&ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum
date added to LUP
2007-06-27 09:52:22
date last changed
2017-07-09 03:44:59
@article{92113870-a595-4256-8d55-7ed5e514fd1e,
  abstract     = {The effect of the diving response on alveolar gas exchange was investigated in 15 subjects. During steady-state exercise (80 W) on a cycle ergometer, the subjects performed 40-s apneas in air and 40-s apneas with face immersion in cold (10°C) water. Heart rate decreased and blood pressure increased during apneas, and the responses were augmented by face immersion. Oxygen uptake from the lungs decreased during apnea in air (-22% compared with eupneic control) and was further reduced during apnea with face immersion (-25% compared with eupneic control). The plasma lactate concentration increased from control (11%) after apnea in air and even more after apnea with face immersion (20%), suggesting an increased anaerobic metabolism during apneas. The lung oxygen store was depleted more slowly during apnea with face immersion because of the augmented diving response, probably including a decrease in cardiac output. Venous oxygen stores were probably reduced by the cardiovascular responses. The turnover times of these gas stores would have been prolonged, reducing their effect on the oxygen uptake in the lungs. Thus the human diving response has an oxygen-conserving effect.},
  author       = {Andersson, Johan and Linér, Mats and Fredsted, Anne and Schagatay, Erika K},
  issn         = {1522-1601},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1005--1010},
  publisher    = {American Physiological Society},
  series       = {Journal of Applied Physiology},
  title        = {Cardiovascular and respiratory responses to apneas with and without face immersion in exercising humans.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.01057.2002},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2004},
}