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Impact of home mechanical ventilation on health-related quality of life in patients with chronic alveolar hypoventilation: a prospective study.

Dellborg, Catharina; Olofson, Jan; Midgren, Bengt LU ; Caro, Oscar; Bergman, Bengt; Skoogh, Bengt-Eric and Sullivan, Marianne (2008) In Clinical Respiratory Journal 2(1). p.26-35
Abstract
Background: Nocturnal ventilatory support by nasal positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) is an established treatment method in patients with chronic alveolar hypoventilation (CAH). The knowledge about its long-term effects on health-related quality of life (HRQL) is limited. Methods: In a prospective, longitudinal, single-strand study, patients with CAH caused by non-COPD conditions, consecutively recruited among referral patients in three Swedish university hospital pulmonary departments, were examined at baseline and after 9 months (n = 35) and 8 years (n = 11) on NPPV treatment. Both volume pre-set and pressure pre-set ventilators were used. Patients completed a battery of condition-specific and generic HRQL questionnaires at baseline... (More)
Background: Nocturnal ventilatory support by nasal positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) is an established treatment method in patients with chronic alveolar hypoventilation (CAH). The knowledge about its long-term effects on health-related quality of life (HRQL) is limited. Methods: In a prospective, longitudinal, single-strand study, patients with CAH caused by non-COPD conditions, consecutively recruited among referral patients in three Swedish university hospital pulmonary departments, were examined at baseline and after 9 months (n = 35) and 8 years (n = 11) on NPPV treatment. Both volume pre-set and pressure pre-set ventilators were used. Patients completed a battery of condition-specific and generic HRQL questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. Spirometry and blood gases were measured. Compliance with treatment, side effects and patient satisfaction were evaluated. Results: After 9 months of NPPV, improvements were seen primarily not only in sleep-related domains, but also in emotional behaviour, ambulation and sleep/rest functioning as measured with the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP). Improvements in sleep-related symptoms were related to effectiveness in ventilation, evaluated by morning PaCO2, and remained by 8 years. Mental well-being was stable over time, while emotional distress improved by 8 years. Satisfaction with treatment was high in spite of frequent side effects. Conclusion: NPPV improves HRQL, particularly in condition-specific areas. Improvements are related to effectiveness in ventilation. Side effects are common, but compliance is good And patient satisfaction is high. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
quality of life thoracic, wall deformities, prospective study, neuromuscular diseases, chronic alveolar hypoventilation, nasal positive pressure ventilation
in
Clinical Respiratory Journal
volume
2
issue
1
pages
26 - 35
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000257155800005
  • scopus:58249090102
ISSN
1752-6981
DOI
10.1111/j.1752-699X.2007.00034.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f25a527d-5c87-4f40-b1cf-6a2d2bf6e0d3 (old id 1187064)
date added to LUP
2008-09-04 11:01:15
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:37:42
@article{f25a527d-5c87-4f40-b1cf-6a2d2bf6e0d3,
  abstract     = {Background: Nocturnal ventilatory support by nasal positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) is an established treatment method in patients with chronic alveolar hypoventilation (CAH). The knowledge about its long-term effects on health-related quality of life (HRQL) is limited. Methods: In a prospective, longitudinal, single-strand study, patients with CAH caused by non-COPD conditions, consecutively recruited among referral patients in three Swedish university hospital pulmonary departments, were examined at baseline and after 9 months (n = 35) and 8 years (n = 11) on NPPV treatment. Both volume pre-set and pressure pre-set ventilators were used. Patients completed a battery of condition-specific and generic HRQL questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. Spirometry and blood gases were measured. Compliance with treatment, side effects and patient satisfaction were evaluated. Results: After 9 months of NPPV, improvements were seen primarily not only in sleep-related domains, but also in emotional behaviour, ambulation and sleep/rest functioning as measured with the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP). Improvements in sleep-related symptoms were related to effectiveness in ventilation, evaluated by morning PaCO2, and remained by 8 years. Mental well-being was stable over time, while emotional distress improved by 8 years. Satisfaction with treatment was high in spite of frequent side effects. Conclusion: NPPV improves HRQL, particularly in condition-specific areas. Improvements are related to effectiveness in ventilation. Side effects are common, but compliance is good And patient satisfaction is high.},
  author       = {Dellborg, Catharina and Olofson, Jan and Midgren, Bengt and Caro, Oscar and Bergman, Bengt and Skoogh, Bengt-Eric and Sullivan, Marianne},
  issn         = {1752-6981},
  keyword      = {quality of life thoracic,wall deformities,prospective study,neuromuscular diseases,chronic alveolar hypoventilation,nasal positive pressure ventilation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {26--35},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Clinical Respiratory Journal},
  title        = {Impact of home mechanical ventilation on health-related quality of life in patients with chronic alveolar hypoventilation: a prospective study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-699X.2007.00034.x},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2008},
}