Advanced

Invasion under a trade-off between density dependence and maximum growth rate

Aikio, Sami; Valosaari, Kata-Riina; Ranta, Esa; Kaitala, Veijo and Lundberg, Per LU (2008) In Population Ecology 50(3). p.307-317
Abstract
The invasion of alien species and genotypes is an increasing concern in contemporary ecology. A central question is, what life-history traits enable invasion amidst populations of wild species and conventional cultivars? In order to invade, the initially rare species must perform better than their resident competitors. We conducted a mathematical analysis and simulation of a two-species extension of the Maynard Smith and Slatkin model for population dynamics in discrete time to study the role of density dependence as different types of competition in the invasion of new species. The type of density dependence ranged from scramble to contest competition. This led to intrinsic dynamics of the species range from point equilibrium to cycles... (More)
The invasion of alien species and genotypes is an increasing concern in contemporary ecology. A central question is, what life-history traits enable invasion amidst populations of wild species and conventional cultivars? In order to invade, the initially rare species must perform better than their resident competitors. We conducted a mathematical analysis and simulation of a two-species extension of the Maynard Smith and Slatkin model for population dynamics in discrete time to study the role of density dependence as different types of competition in the invasion of new species. The type of density dependence ranged from scramble to contest competition. This led to intrinsic dynamics of the species range from point equilibrium to cycles and chaos. The traits were treated either as free parameters or constrained by a trade-off resulting from a common fixed strength of density dependence or equilibrium density. Resident and intruder traits had up to ten-fold differences in all of the parameters investigated. Higher equilibrium density of the intruder allowed invasion. Under constrained equilibrium density, an intrinsically stable intruder could invade an unstable resident population. Scramble competition made a population more susceptible to invasion than contest competition (e.g., limitation by light or territory availability). This predicts that a population which is mainly limited by food (or nutrients in plants) is more likely to be invaded than a population limited by a hierarchical competition, such as light among plants. The intruder population may have an effect on the resident population's dynamics, which makes the traditional invasion analysis unable to predict invasion outcome. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
population dynamics, competition, contest, scramble
in
Population Ecology
volume
50
issue
3
pages
307 - 317
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000256763300008
  • scopus:45449088494
ISSN
1438-390X
DOI
10.1007/s10144-008-0085-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
13504fe3-4af6-4477-9125-be719b45e630 (old id 1187334)
date added to LUP
2008-09-05 11:36:36
date last changed
2017-05-28 03:33:17
@article{13504fe3-4af6-4477-9125-be719b45e630,
  abstract     = {The invasion of alien species and genotypes is an increasing concern in contemporary ecology. A central question is, what life-history traits enable invasion amidst populations of wild species and conventional cultivars? In order to invade, the initially rare species must perform better than their resident competitors. We conducted a mathematical analysis and simulation of a two-species extension of the Maynard Smith and Slatkin model for population dynamics in discrete time to study the role of density dependence as different types of competition in the invasion of new species. The type of density dependence ranged from scramble to contest competition. This led to intrinsic dynamics of the species range from point equilibrium to cycles and chaos. The traits were treated either as free parameters or constrained by a trade-off resulting from a common fixed strength of density dependence or equilibrium density. Resident and intruder traits had up to ten-fold differences in all of the parameters investigated. Higher equilibrium density of the intruder allowed invasion. Under constrained equilibrium density, an intrinsically stable intruder could invade an unstable resident population. Scramble competition made a population more susceptible to invasion than contest competition (e.g., limitation by light or territory availability). This predicts that a population which is mainly limited by food (or nutrients in plants) is more likely to be invaded than a population limited by a hierarchical competition, such as light among plants. The intruder population may have an effect on the resident population's dynamics, which makes the traditional invasion analysis unable to predict invasion outcome.},
  author       = {Aikio, Sami and Valosaari, Kata-Riina and Ranta, Esa and Kaitala, Veijo and Lundberg, Per},
  issn         = {1438-390X},
  keyword      = {population dynamics,competition,contest,scramble},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {307--317},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Population Ecology},
  title        = {Invasion under a trade-off between density dependence and maximum growth rate},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10144-008-0085-5},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2008},
}