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Are there any positive consequences of childhood cancer? A review of the literature

Mattsson, E; Lindgren, Björn LU and Von Essen, L. (2008) In Acta Oncologica 47(2). p.199-206
Abstract
The aim was to investigate whether there are any positive consequences of childhood cancer. Studies published 1990-2005 reporting survivors' descriptions of positive consequences of childhood cancer were identified through a search in the databases CINAHL, PsycINFO, and PubMed. According to a manifest content analysis, positive consequences were referred to three themes: life values, relations to others, and relation to self. A second search in the same databases was conducted to identify studies investigating whether survivors of childhood cancer differ from comparison groups with regard to variables assigned to these themes. In these studies, no conclusions about positive consequences with regard to the theme life values can be drawn, as... (More)
The aim was to investigate whether there are any positive consequences of childhood cancer. Studies published 1990-2005 reporting survivors' descriptions of positive consequences of childhood cancer were identified through a search in the databases CINAHL, PsycINFO, and PubMed. According to a manifest content analysis, positive consequences were referred to three themes: life values, relations to others, and relation to self. A second search in the same databases was conducted to identify studies investigating whether survivors of childhood cancer differ from comparison groups with regard to variables assigned to these themes. In these studies, no conclusions about positive consequences with regard to the theme life values can be drawn, as only one study was identified. In addition, only a small minority of findings from comparative studies indicate that childhood cancer has any positive consequences with regard to relations to others and relation to self. A majority of the results indicate that survivors do not differ from comparison groups, whereas some findings highlight that friendship and marital status are areas of concern, and parenthood and sexuality are areas of potential concern. It is recommended that survivors of childhood cancer are followed up by a multi-professional team, focusing not only on the survivors' health status but also on relations to family, friends, and partners. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Oncologica
volume
47
issue
2
pages
199 - 206
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000254082900004
  • scopus:38349092724
ISSN
1651-226X
DOI
10.1080/02841860701765667
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fa7e9b26-6138-4e4d-8442-3866cec78e86 (old id 1191687)
date added to LUP
2008-09-05 11:11:32
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:51:21
@article{fa7e9b26-6138-4e4d-8442-3866cec78e86,
  abstract     = {The aim was to investigate whether there are any positive consequences of childhood cancer. Studies published 1990-2005 reporting survivors' descriptions of positive consequences of childhood cancer were identified through a search in the databases CINAHL, PsycINFO, and PubMed. According to a manifest content analysis, positive consequences were referred to three themes: life values, relations to others, and relation to self. A second search in the same databases was conducted to identify studies investigating whether survivors of childhood cancer differ from comparison groups with regard to variables assigned to these themes. In these studies, no conclusions about positive consequences with regard to the theme life values can be drawn, as only one study was identified. In addition, only a small minority of findings from comparative studies indicate that childhood cancer has any positive consequences with regard to relations to others and relation to self. A majority of the results indicate that survivors do not differ from comparison groups, whereas some findings highlight that friendship and marital status are areas of concern, and parenthood and sexuality are areas of potential concern. It is recommended that survivors of childhood cancer are followed up by a multi-professional team, focusing not only on the survivors' health status but also on relations to family, friends, and partners.},
  author       = {Mattsson, E and Lindgren, Björn and Von Essen, L.},
  issn         = {1651-226X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {199--206},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Oncologica},
  title        = {Are there any positive consequences of childhood cancer? A review of the literature},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02841860701765667},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2008},
}