Advanced

Physical benefits of expanded physical education in primary school: findings from a 3-year intervention study in Sweden

Sollerhed, Ann-Christin LU and Ejlertsson, G (2008) In Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports 18(1). p.102-107
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess whether a school-based program with expanded physical education lessons was effective in increasing children's physical capacity and in preventing excessive weight gain in children. The study performed in 2000-2003 comprised 132 children, 73 boys and 59 girls at baseline 6-9 years and in follow-up 9-12 years, attending two different schools with a similar size, appearance and structure in a rural area. The norm school (N-school) followed the stipulated curricular time, one to two physical education lessons a week, while the intervention school (I-school) increased it to four lessons. More positive changes in physical index (the sum of the age-standardized results in 11 physical tests) were found among... (More)
The aim of this study was to assess whether a school-based program with expanded physical education lessons was effective in increasing children's physical capacity and in preventing excessive weight gain in children. The study performed in 2000-2003 comprised 132 children, 73 boys and 59 girls at baseline 6-9 years and in follow-up 9-12 years, attending two different schools with a similar size, appearance and structure in a rural area. The norm school (N-school) followed the stipulated curricular time, one to two physical education lessons a week, while the intervention school (I-school) increased it to four lessons. More positive changes in physical index (the sum of the age-standardized results in 11 physical tests) were found among children in the I-school than in the N-school. The number of children who increased body mass index (BMI) increased in both schools, but a lower increase in BMI could be seen in the I-school. Expanded physical education lessons could increase physical status among both overweight and normal-weight children, in particular aerobic fitness. The weekly dose of physical activity must be higher than 40 min a day and must start earlier in children's life to be more effective in combating BMI increase. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
BMI, weight gain, running, endurance, physical status, children, physical education, intervention
in
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
volume
18
issue
1
pages
102 - 107
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000253484400014
  • scopus:39449094231
ISSN
1600-0838
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0838.2007.00636.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
39f11b4e-7325-408a-bc8d-0ab784482d63 (old id 1193721)
alternative location
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119407074/abstract
date added to LUP
2008-09-09 10:00:57
date last changed
2017-09-24 04:03:14
@article{39f11b4e-7325-408a-bc8d-0ab784482d63,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to assess whether a school-based program with expanded physical education lessons was effective in increasing children's physical capacity and in preventing excessive weight gain in children. The study performed in 2000-2003 comprised 132 children, 73 boys and 59 girls at baseline 6-9 years and in follow-up 9-12 years, attending two different schools with a similar size, appearance and structure in a rural area. The norm school (N-school) followed the stipulated curricular time, one to two physical education lessons a week, while the intervention school (I-school) increased it to four lessons. More positive changes in physical index (the sum of the age-standardized results in 11 physical tests) were found among children in the I-school than in the N-school. The number of children who increased body mass index (BMI) increased in both schools, but a lower increase in BMI could be seen in the I-school. Expanded physical education lessons could increase physical status among both overweight and normal-weight children, in particular aerobic fitness. The weekly dose of physical activity must be higher than 40 min a day and must start earlier in children's life to be more effective in combating BMI increase.},
  author       = {Sollerhed, Ann-Christin and Ejlertsson, G},
  issn         = {1600-0838},
  keyword      = {BMI,weight gain,running,endurance,physical status,children,physical education,intervention},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {102--107},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports},
  title        = {Physical benefits of expanded physical education in primary school: findings from a 3-year intervention study in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2007.00636.x},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2008},
}